Drill storage diy

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How To Build A DIY Drill Charging Station and 2x4 Workbench Base

Learn how to build a simple 2x4 mobile workbench base and drill charging station, perfect for getting your garage shop storage dialed in!

Note: Below are affiliate links

🛠 Tools Used On The Project:

📦 Materials Used On The Project:

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Download The 2x4 Workbench SketchUp Model!

2x4 workbench base.jpg

Click the button below if you’d like to download the free SketchUp model that I created to go along with this video. I realize this is a super simple design, but I know some of you would have asked for it, so here it is, free of charge!

Step 1: Address The Garage Problem AKA The Shop!

Since getting the shelving up, the main problem area in the garage has been my workshop, since I was lacking organization and, more importantly, mobility. I had started to get things organized with some of CRAFTSMAN’s VersaTrack hanging storage, as …

Since getting the shelving up, the main problem area in the garage has been my workshop, since I was lacking organization and, more importantly, mobility. I had started to get things organized with some of CRAFTSMAN’s VersaTrack hanging storage, as well as one of their sweet tool chests, but things still weren’t quite dialed in.

What I really needed was a better way to move my workbench and miter saw station out from against the wall to work on projects, then back against the wall when I wasn’t working in there so my wife could get her car in.

Step 2: Design A Plan For Mobile Workbench In Garage

What I really needed was a better way to move my workbench and miter saw station out from against the wall to work on projects, then back against the wall when I wasn’t working in there so my wife could get her car in.

To solve this issue, I whipped up a quick mobile base for my workbench, and I kept the base super simple, using 2x4s for the platforms and 2x6s for the legs.

Step 2: Breaking Down Lumber For Mobile Workbench

To build the base, I first cut the pieces to size at the miter saw.

To build the base, I first cut the pieces to size at the miter saw.

Step 3: Assembling Mobile Workbench Framework

Anyway, after cutting the parts for the platforms to size, I could get them assembled with 3” screws. These platforms are essentially assembled like a miniature wall, and I just added two screws at each joint. It’s also really helpful to pre-drive y…

Anyway, after cutting the parts for the platforms to size, I could get them assembled with 3” screws. These platforms are essentially assembled like a miniature wall, and I just added two screws at each joint. It’s also really helpful to pre-drive your screws here, since it can be tricky to hold the piece in place while trying to add these long screws.

After getting the first platform assembled, I repeated the process on the second platform and, as you might notice, I screwed up the spacing and ended up making all but one of the pieces too close to each other, leaving me with weird spacing for the last piece.

Once the pieces were cut to size, I could get the legs attached to the two platforms to complete the base structure. I did add some glue to these joints for a little added strength, and added five 2 ½” screws per joint. Probably overkill, but this t…

With the two platforms assembled, I could get the legs cut to length from a 2x6 over at the miter saw.

Once the pieces were cut to size, I could get the legs attached to the two platforms to complete the base structure. I did add some glue to these joints for a little added strength, and added five 2 ½” screws per joint. Probably overkill, but this thing ended up super sturdy.

I also made sure the legs were nice and square and flushed them up with the ends of the platforms before adding the screws.

I repeated the process at the other end of the base and then mounted the other two legs on the opposite side of the base. As you can see, I changed the orientation of these legs, and this was for a few reasons.

One, it was easier to get the piece of plywood I would be using for the bottom shelf into this opening. Two, it would be easier to access the items on the shelf from the front of the workbench. And C, having the legs oriented this way helps to prevent racking side-to-side.

One, it was easier to get the piece of plywood I would be using for the bottom shelf into this opening. Two, it would be easier to access the items on the shelf from the front of the workbench. And C, having the legs oriented this way helps to preve…

Step 4: Installing Locking Casters To Mobile Workbench

Once the legs were on, I could flip the base over and add some 4” locking casters from Rockler. These are my favorite casters by far and make for an easy-to-move workbench that locks down securely when it’s time to get to work.

Once the legs were on, I could flip the base over and add some 4” locking casters from Rockler. These are my favorite casters by far and make for an easy-to-move workbench that locks down securely when it’s time to get to work.

After adding the casters, I flipped the base over and, as you can see, it wasn’t quite flat due to the less-than-straight 2x4s, but it ended up settling out once everything was loaded onto the workbench.

Step 5: Transferring Old Workbench Top To New Base

Anyway, after getting the tops moved over, I centered them on the base and then attached them to the base using 1 ¼” screws. It was a little tricky to add the screws inside the tops at first, but I picked up this CRAFTSMAN flexible bit holder and it…

Next, I could get everything moved off of my existing workbench so I could move the worktop over onto the new base. This workbench is actually a commercially available system from FastCap and it’s an awesome combination of a miter saw station, workbench, and outfeed table, but FastCap designed it to be flat packed so it can be taken to job sites.

I’m not likely to ever use the workbench in that way, so I figured a more sturdy, more mobile base like this would work much better for me.

Now, obviously most of you don’t have an existing workbench top like this, but you could easily make the legs on the base a little taller, add a piece of plywood or MDF on top, and you’d have a simple, sturdy workbench.

Now, obviously most of you don’t have an existing workbench top like this, but you could easily make the legs on the base a little taller, add a piece of plywood or MDF on top, and you’d have a simple, sturdy workbench.

Anyway, after getting the tops moved over, I centered them on the base and then attached them to the base using 1 ¼” screws. It was a little tricky to add the screws inside the tops at first, but I picked up this CRAFTSMAN flexible bit holder and it worked great for this. I actually ended up just running the bit holder through one of the holes in the top of the workbench and using it as a bit extension, rather than trying to bend it to get inside the top, and this worked even better.

Next, I could get the piece of ½” plywood for the bottom shelf cut to size with my circular saw and then I installed it in the workbench. I made the cut a little long, so I had to persuade it a bit to get it into place, but it ended up fitting well in the end. I attached the plywood to the base with more of the trim head screws I used for the shelving, and I’m really excited to have all of this storage under the workbench now.

And, as luck would have it, the battery powered miter saw fits perfectly on this bottom shelf, so I can keep my larger miter saw set up on the workbench and then use the smaller miter saw for more mobile use.

Step 6: Building A Drill Charging Station

I found a great, simple design from Amy over at Her Tool Belt, which I’ll link to in the video description, and I just modified it slightly for my needs and to use up the plywood scraps I had on hand.

With that, the workbench was good to go, so I could move on to the last bit of garage organization, a drill charging station. Drill charging stations are a great addition to any shop and I love the one I have at my main shop, so I knew I definitely wanted one here at the house.

I found a great, simple design from Amy over at Her Tool Belt, which I’ll link to in the video description, and I just modified it slightly for my needs and to use up the plywood scraps I had on hand.

Step 7: Milling Plywood For Drill Charging Station

First, I cut the sides and shelves to size at the table saw, using some larger scrap pieces of ¾” plywood I had left over from the laundry room countertop I built a few weeks ago.

First, I cut the sides and shelves to size at the table saw, using some larger scrap pieces of ¾” plywood I had left over from the laundry room countertop I built a few weeks ago.

Once those pieces were cut to size, I ripped strips to width to be used as the dividers and hangers for the CRAFTSMAN drills, impact drivers, and cordless nailers I would be storing in this charging station.

With the parts cut to width at the table saw, I could cut them to length at the miter saw, setting up a quick stop block to quickly batch out the pieces.

Next, I laid out where the dividers would be mounted on the lower shelf using a speed square. In this design, the dividers are spaced apart three inches but, if I had to do this again, I’d probably add in another ⅛” or so between dividers, just so I…

Next, I laid out where the dividers would be mounted on the lower shelf using a speed square. In this design, the dividers are spaced apart three inches but, if I had to do this again, I’d probably add in another ⅛” or so between dividers, just so I could have more flexibility in which tools would fit into these slots in the future.

The first things to actually assemble on the drill charging station were these little t-shaped sections, which are what the tools hang from. The easiest way I found to do this was to use a few pieces of ¾” plywood to help center the piece below, the clamp the pieces down and tack the pieces together with brad nails.

Step 8: Assembling Plywood Drill Charging Station

The first things to actually assemble on the drill charging station were these little t-shaped sections, which are what the tools hang from. The easiest way I found to do this was to use a few pieces of ¾” plywood to help center the piece below, the…

Once it was tacked together, I came back with more of the trim head screws to make everything permanent.

Next, I could start getting the hangers mounted to the underside of the bottom shelf. I used a square, along with my layout lines from before, to help make sure everything was in the right spot, then I clamped it in place, flipped the whole thing over, and tacked the hanger in place with more brad nails.

I repeated the process for the rest of the hangers, making sure my spacingstayed even, and then I could test the fit.

Everything seemed to fit well except for the impact driver with the magnetic screw holder attached, but I figure I can just hang that tool upside down.

With the fit looking good, I came back and added screws to connect the hangers permanently.

With the fit looking good, I came back and added screws to connect the hangers permanently.

Before attaching the sides to the shelves, I needed to add a ¾” by ¾” strip to the bottom edge of the sides, and this will act as half of the hanger for the two tools at either end of the charging station. Once again, I attached this strip with brad nails and screws.

Next, I could get the bottom shelf attached to the sides, and hopefully now you can see what those little strips from the last step were for, basically just completing the hanger structure. I made sure the bottom of the hangers and the bottom of the sides were in line, clamped everything together, and then tacked the parts together.

Once that was done, I could add the two upper shelves, and the spacing on these is completely up to you. I decided to go with one slightly taller shelf for all of my batteries, and one shorter shelf for holding my drill and impact bit sets. Once again, I just tacked everything in place temporarily and then, after deciding everything looked good, I came back and added screws to tie it all together.

Step 9: Adding Shelves To Plywood Drill Charging Station

Once that was done, I could add the two upper shelves, and the spacing on these is completely up to you. I decided to go with one slightly taller shelf for all of my batteries, and one shorter shelf for holding my drill and impact bit sets. Once aga…

I didn’t have enough plywood on hand to create a full back panel, so I decided to just add this offcut from the bottom shelf on the workbench as a back panel for the two shelves. That way, stuff isn’t falling off the back of the shelves.

I had planned to mount this charging station using an integrated French cleat so the whole thing sat flush on the wall, but it turned out I didn’t have any plywood strips long enough, so I had to get creative.

Instead of using a French cleat, I ripped a 2x4 down so that it had one square edge and then mounted that at the top back edge of the charging station. This 2x4 gave me plenty of surface area to drive screws through when mounting the charging station to the wall, and I didn’t have to purchase any extra materials.

Finally, I could get the charging station mounted on the wall and, of course, I wanted it to be near an outlet. Unfortunately, the only spot I could fit this charging station with everything organized how I had it didn’t really work.

Step 10: Mounting Plywood Drill Charging Station To Garage Wall

Finally, I could get the charging station mounted on the wall and, of course, I wanted it to be near an outlet. Unfortunately, the only spot I could fit this charging station with everything organized how I had it didn’t really work.

After thinking about it a bit, I took down one of the VersaTrack sections and that opened up the perfect spot for the charging station, right by the outlet and not too high for adding and removing batteries from the chargers on the top shelf.

Once it was mounted, I could spend some time getting the charging station loaded up with my various chargers, batteries, bit sets and, of course, the tools themselves. I also added a power strip to the top edge of the station, so I can have all of the chargers plugged into that, leaving my outlet freed up for other corded tools.

Step 11: Organizing Drill Charging Station

Once it was mounted, I could spend some time getting the charging station loaded up with my various chargers, batteries, bit sets and, of course, the tools themselves. I also added a power strip to the top edge of the station, so I can have all of t…
Home Improvement, Shop Projects, Project Videos, Woodworking ProjectsJohnny Brookecrafted workshop, workshop, woodworking, diy, howto, how-to, make, maker, build, furniture, modern, mid century, table saw, festool, powermaticComment
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Cordless Power Tool Storage Shelf (Free Plans)

I recently partnered up with The Home Depot through their Prospective program to review some of the new 20v MAX with Flexvolt Advantage tools. I’ll never say no to tools, but it’s abundantly clear that I needed a better way to store them so this week I decided to build myself a simple cordless power tool storage shelf for the workshop.

Download the Free Plans Here to Follow Along 

cordless power tool storage shelf free plansThis project contains affiliate links to the The Home Depot who generously supplied some of the tool(s) I’ll be utilizing in this project. All opinions are herein are my own. Visit my disclosure page for more information on affiliate and compensation this site accepts. 


Tool List:

Material List:

  • 4′ x 4′ – 3/4″ plywood
  • Titebond II Wood Glue
  • 1 1/2″ wood screws, brad nails, or pocket hole screws

Getting Started

breaking down plywood on the table saw cordless power tool storage shelfThe first thing you’ll need to do is break down the plywood. There are a lot of different ways to do this. If you have a table saw, you can use that to cut the piece of plywood into the 14″ strips. You can also use a straight edge or a level and a circular saw or a combination. Follow the cut diagram in the plans to cut the pieces as shown.

dewalt 20v max circular saw with flexvolt advantage cutting plywoodUsing a combination of the circular saw and a jigsaw, cut the kerf cuts for the drill/ driver locations into the bottom shelf piece and the saw kerf cuts for the middle shelf piece as shown in the plans.

milwaukee 18v fuel palm router round over plywoodUse a 1/4″ round over bit and a palm router to round over the cut outs for the saw and drill locations if you choose to.


Making a French Cleat

French cleat wall hangingA french cleat is a popular way of hanging shelves/ cabinetry because it gives you some flexibility in being able to easily remove the shelf or cabinet. It involves creating 2 strips of wood mitered at 45° that interlock in place. One piece goes on the wall with the mitered edge facing up and towards the wall. The other piece is mounted to the shelf or cabinet with the mitered edge facing down and in. The shelf can then be easily lifted and set on the cleat giving it plenty of strength, and easily moved by lifting up on the shelf and removing it.


Assembling the Shelf

If you have a Kreg K4 jig, drill pocket holes into the side pieces at the top and bottom so that you can mount them to the top and bottom of the shelf. Also drill holes on the underside of the middle shelf on each end to secure it in place as well.

If you don’t have a pocket hole jig, you’ll just assemble the shelf with screws or brad nails as you choose. Apply a liberal amount of wood glue to one end of each of the side pieces and secure them to the bottom piece with screws. Depending on the screws you’re using, you made need to pre-drill to keep the plywood from splitting. Apply wood glue to the top of the side pieces and set the top shelf in place. Secure it with screws or brad nails.

Measure 9″ from the top of the side pieces on each side. This mark will be the top of the middle shelf. Apply some wood glue to the ends of the shelf and secure it in place with screws or brad nails.

installing a wall cleat on a cabinetAttach one of the french cleat pieces inside the back of the cabinet at the top. Make sure the miter is facing towards the front and down. Attach the opposite piece to the wall where you’d like to hang the cabinet. Make sure that piece has the miter facing up and towards the wall. Lift the cabinet and set it in place on the cleat.

cordless power tool storage shelfLoad the shelf up with your favorite cordless power tools and you’re good to go! Thanks for following along with this simple shop organization project.

If you liked this project check out some of my other Free plans at the links below!


DIY Budget Friendly Workbench

FREE Workshop Base Cabinet Plans

 

 

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The cordless drill is probably your most-used power tool, so why not make it as easily accessible as possible? Instead of searching through tool cases every time and then trying to locate a charged battery, keep your drills and drivers within easy reach above your workbench by storing them in these DIY tool holsters.

The holsters are built from 3-inch PVC pipe cut to 8-inch lengths. The slot that the tool slides into measures 1 1/2 inches across and 5 inches from the end. Use a holesaw or spade bit to cut the rounded end and then cut the sides out using a jigsaw. Read more about this project from ToolBox Buzz.

To finish the project, sand the edges and then mount the holsters to the underside of a shelf, as seen above. Make sure you measure the distance from the wall before you start, however, to make sure you'll have enough space, and remember that you'll need a little extra space if you plan to leave bits in the drills for instant action.

Timothy DahlDIY EditorTimothy is a lifelong DIY enthusiast who is fixated on smart home tech, beautiful tools, and wrenching on his FJ62 Land Cruiser.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Sours: https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/tools/how-to/a19471/drill-storage-holsters/
Power Tool Storage Cabinet. How I made this Milwaukee Tools Storage Cabinet For Under $30. TUTORIAL!

Custom Drill Storage and Charge Station – Easy

The custom drill storage and charge station and tool review is sponsored by The Home Depot. I have been compensated for my time and provided with product (tools). All ideas and opinions are my own. This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy.

Over 5 years ago, I made some plans for my friend to build a cordless drill storage charge station with 5 stalls. It has been the most built project on my site, which is awesome. My original version uses plywood, which was great for using up scrap pieces. However there have been 2 comments that I get frequently, “I want to make this but I need X stalls” and “I don’t have a table saw to cut down plywood.” To solve both of these comments, I have made a new plan that uses simpler tools (miter saw or circular saw and straight edge). This custom drill storage and charge station build uses a 1×10 board and a spreadsheet to input how many stalls you want for tools and kick out a custom cut list.

If you want a 2 stall drill storage, you can do that.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Or if you want a 10 stall drill storage, you can do that.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

This custom drill storage organizer makes a great homemade gift for your favorite tool loving friends. To celebrate Christmas I’m giving away $100 Christmas Cash each week until Christmas (enter using the rafflecopter widget at the bottom of the post).

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

How to Build a Custom Drill Storage and Charge Station

the easy way

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Cordless Drill Charge Station Cut List and plans – hertoolbelt <-download

If that link doesn’t work, try this one: Cordless Drill Charge Station Cut List and plans – hertoolbelt

Download this spreadsheet and enter in:

  • How many ‘stalls’ you want
  • How wide the gap width needs to be (default is 1 1/2″)

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.comThe spreadsheet will also tell you how many feet of 1×10 board you need.

Materials

Tools Used

Cut Diagram

Sample cut diagram (for 4 stalls)

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Step 1 – Cut Board

Cut the 1×10 according to the cut list. (I used a miter saw to make the cuts.) On the top shelf, cut the width down to 8 1/2″.

On the side pieces, cut a dog ear (45 deg miter) on the top front corner at 11 3/4″ up from the bottom.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Drill pilot holes in the 2 sides, back, lower shelf, stall supports and side supports. If you want your screw heads flush with the surface, drill countersinks. See diagram below.

Make sure the side pieces are mirror images of each other.

 

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Step 2 – Assembly

Sides

Attach the 3/4″ x 3/4″ side support piece to the inside face of the side piece, make the bottoms flush. Secure with wood glue and 1 1/4″ screws. Repeat for both sides

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Dividers

Mark the centers of the stall supports (1 1/8″) and the centers of the dividers (3/8″).

  1. Line up the center of the dividers with the center of the stall supports.
  2. Use wood glue and 1 1/4″ screws to secure together.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Mark the centers on the other of the dividers (3/8″) and mark the center lines of the pilot holes (3 3/8″, 3 3/4″, 3 3/4″, etc).

  1. Line up the divider centers with pilot hole center lines on the lower shelf.
  2. Use wood glue and 1 1/4″ screws to attach dividers to lower shelf.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Shelf

On the back piece, mark 2 1/2″ down from the top. Attach the top shelf to the back with wood glue and 1 1/4″ screws.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

All Together

On the side pieces, mark 2 1/2″ down and 9 1/4″ down from the top. Use wood glue and 1 1/4″ screws to attach the side to the back, top shelf and lower shelf.

 

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Repeat for the other side.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

If you want to install a power strip to charge batteries, you may want to drill a hole near the top on the side to run the cord. Drill the hole wherever convenient for your setup.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

The Bosch Daredevil spade bits are an easy way to drill larger diameter holes. The spade bits have a threaded cone that ‘pulls’ the bit through the wood with limited effort. If you need the hole a little larger for the plug, you can move the bit side to side to ream the hole a little larger for the plug.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Attach the power strip to the wood where convenient. I measure where the keyholes are on the back of the power strip and put small screws in the back piece where the keyholes will go.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.comA bit kit like this Ryobi 70 piece bit set. This kit of bits are impact rated bits with hex shank for impact drivers or drills. It includes the handy magnetic screw guide, socket adapters, nut drivers and super handy storage case.

Then run the plug through the hole and install the power strip on the small screws.

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

 

Step 3 – Finish

Sand the custom drill storage station smooth. Stain the wood as desired. Then when the stain dries add a top coat as desired.

To mount the custom drill storage and charging station to the wall, drill holes through the back piece into studs in the wall. If studs are not available, you can use heavy duty drywall anchors.

Snap a pic of your finished organizer and tag me @hertoolbelt on instagram. I’d love to see your creation!

$100 Christmas Cash Giveaway

The giveaway ends Dec 20, 2019 at 12am MST.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

“I acknowledge that The Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Tool Review Program. As a part of the Program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word Of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics Code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.”

Organize your cordless drills and tools with a custom drill storage and charge station for about $20! Tell the plans how many tool stalls you want, and the free plans will customize your cut list. Free plans on hertoolbelt.com

Filed Under: Built From Scratch, Garage, OrganizationTagged With: drill storage, garage, organization

Sours: https://www.hertoolbelt.com/custom-drill-storage-charge-station/

Storage diy drill

Cordless Drill Storage – Charging Station

Hi!  I’d love to for you to follow me on Pinterest Her Tool Belt  and if you love instagram, you can keep up with me there too!

Our first monthly Reader Request Plan comes from Justin!  He wants a 5 dock cordless drill storage and battery charging station, that can hang on his garage wall.  What a great idea to corral your drills, batteries, and battery chargers in one place.  I thought it would be handy to include a drawer for drill bits and stuff.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

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Need and different number of tool stalls? Or an easier build?

Check out these updated custom cordless drill organizer plans –> here <–

How to Build a Cordless Drill Organizer and Battery Charging StationOrganize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy.

Materials

Cut List

cut list

*Note:  This organizer fit perfectly with my Ryobi drills (old and new).  If the top of the handle, just under the head of your drill is larger than 1 1/2″, adjust the width of the bottoms (2 1/4″) accordingly.

Cut Diagram

This organizer is great for using up scrap 3/4″ plywood pieces. If you’re making it from a sheet of 3/4″, you can get 3 organizers from 1- 4’x8′ sheet.

*Note you can either make a traditional drawer bottom with dados and 1/4″ plywood, or you can kreg jig a 3/4″ bottom on. This cut diagram has a 3/4″ bottom in it (7 5/8″ x 16 3/8″)

Step 1

Cut out all pieces according to the cut list.  Get the 4 dividers and bottoms.  Mark 3/4″ in from each side of the bottom, to center the divider.  Pre-drill the bottom piece, unless you are using self tapping screws.  Apply a bead of glue and secure each divider and bottom together with 1 1/4″ screws.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Take one of the shelves.  Mark and pre-drill holes to attach the dividers to the shelf.  Glue and attach the dividers to the shelf with 1 1/4″, make sure the screws are flush or lower with the wood surface.  The gap between each divider is 3″.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Step 2

On the 2 sides, measure over and mark 8″ and measure up 10 1/2″ and mark.  Cut between the marks, removing the excess triangle.  Attach with glue and screws, the bottom side piece at the bottom inside of each side, flush with the front and bottom.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

 

On the sides measure up and mark 4 1/2″ and 9 1/4″ from the bottom.  The gap between the shelves is 4″.  Pre-drill the sides, glue and screw the shelves between the sides.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

 

Attach the back, between the sides.  Secure with glue and screws.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Step 3

Dado Drawer Bottom with 1/4″ plywood

Grab the 4 sides of the drawers.  Make dado cuts 1/4″ from the bottom, 1/4″ deep and 1/4″ wide.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station. If you have a Kreg Jig® R3 , you can make pocket joints on each end of the drawer sides (outside) to attach the drawer together.  If not, pre-drill holes through the drawer front and back.

Dry fit the drawer around the drawer bottom, check that it will fit in the drawer slot, trim as necessary.  Use glue and 1 1/4″ screws to assemble the drawer together.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Attach a drawer pull to the front of the drawer.  Sand the cordless drill station as needed.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

To attach it to the wall, first locate studs in your wall.  You’ll also probably want it accessible to a power outlet.  Once you decide where to hang it, pre-drill holes in the back and attach it to the wall/studs with 3″ screws (2 minimum places).

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Add a surge protector/power strip if desired and stock it full of your tools!

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Thanks Justin for the great project idea, have fun organizing you garage!

pin it for later, please

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station.

Organize your tools, free plans for a DIY cordless drill storage and battery charging station. Optional drawer is great for drill bit storage.

 

Filed Under: Free Woodworking Plans, Garage, OrganizationTagged With: battery, Reader Requests, storage, tools

Sours: https://www.hertoolbelt.com/cordless-drill-storage-charging-station/
Build A Drill Storage/Charging Station - Ep #2

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