Normande bulls

Normande bulls DEFAULT

Breeds of Livestock - Normande Cattle

normcow.gif History

The Normande breed has its origin in cattle that were brought to Normandy by the Viking conquerors in the 9th and 10th centuries. For over a thousand years these cattle evolved into a dual purpose breed to meet the milk and meat needs of the residents of northwestern France. The present herd book in France was started in 1883. Though the breed was decimated by the Allied invasion of Normandy during World War II, there are currently 3 million Normandes in France. Their present role in France is to provide rich milk for the cheese industry while maintaining their excellent carcass quality.

Normandes have been exported world-wide but have received their greatest acceptance in South America where they were introduced in the 1890's. The cattle have thrived there as one of the world's best dual purpose breeds. Total numbers there now exceed 4 million purebreds plus countless Normande crossbreds. Columbia alone has 1.6 million purebreds with the rest mainly in Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay and Uruguay. They are a highly adaptable and hardy breed and have done well in beef operations in the Andes Mountains at elevations up to 13,000 feet. The Normande cow with her sound feet and legs can travel great distances over rough terrain to economically convert native roughages.

Carcass Quality

Because of the breed's high muscle mass to bone ratio and their small heads, the Normande has a high percentage yield at slaughter. The carcass is very lean but marbles readily and purebred Normande steers will easily grade choice at 1,250 lbs. The Normande breed won’t produce bulging rear quarters of cheap ground round but will increase the length and width of the top priced loin area cuts. In the 1990 and 1991 Montana 4-H Steer of Merit Carcass Contests, three 7/8 Normande steers placed in the top 10 out of the 1,000 steers entered annually including crossbreds. A 1991 Normande steer had a 16.2 in. rib eye, a 0.15 in. backfat, and a yield grade of 0.99! Feedlots in the U.S. and South America have proved that Normande cross steers and heifers will grade and yield with the best while maintaining moderate carcass size.

Body Type

Normandes are a medium frame size breed with most cows weighing 1,200 to 1,500 lbs. and bulls 2,000 to 2,400 lbs. They possess excellent body depth and spring of rib while maintaining exceptional body length. This characteristic high capacity body type probably explains their ability to perform on high roughage diets. The cattle are also very clean fronted and carry a strong topline. If you've lost volume and depth of body in your commercial cows, Normandes will definitely replace it.

normbull.gif

Maternal Traits

Normande females reach sexual maturity early and have good fertility, mammary conformation, mothering ability and production longevity. They have large pelvic areas and calve easily with calves showing excellent vigor and most birth weights in the 70 to 95 lb. range. In France, milk production averages 14,000 lbs. per lactation with 4.2 % butterfat and 3.5 % protein. You won't find more productive females anywhere and half blood Normande cows are exceptional commercial beef cows when crossed with almost any beef breed.

Growth Rates

With their rich milk, Normande purebred and crossbred cows produce calves with rapid growth rates with no need to creep feed. Weaning weights will be in the 500 to 700 lb. range. Recent bull tests have shown that this rapid growth rate will continue on high roughage feed. Normande bulls have topped the St. Croix Valley Bull Test at River Falls, Wisconsin in both years that they've been entered. In 1991 a Normande bull set an all time station record 4.93 lb. ADG and also had a 3.64 lb. WDA. The second place bull that year was also a Normande. In the 1992 test a Normande bull again topped the field with a 4.68 lb. ADG and a 3.49 lb. WDA. The 140 day test annually features 100 bulls from 8 to 10 different beef breeds fed a corn silage based high roughage ration. Studies in France have documented 5.0 feed conversion rates on the same type of diet.

Information and photographs on the page are provided by the North American Normande Association, 748 Enloe Road, Rewey, WI 53580

Sours: http://afs.okstate.edu/breeds/copy_of_cattle/normande/index.html

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Normande


History

The Normande originated in Normandy, France from cattle brought to the country by Viking conquerors in the 9 thand 10 thcenturies. For over a thousand years these cattle evolved into a dual purpose breed to meet the milk and meat needs of the residents of northwestern France.
The present herd book in France was started in 1883. Though the breed was decimated by the Allied invasion of Normandy during World War II, there are currently 3 million Normandes in France. Their present role in France is to provide rich milk for the cheese industry while maintaining their excellent carcass quality. In other parts of the world such as the US, this breed has been primarily bred for beef but now there is a strong push for it to be used for dairy too.

In France, the Normande is associated with the production of such famous cheeses as Camembert, Pont-Lévêque and Livarot.

While the Normande has always been used for dairy, it has always presented strong dual-purpose qualities. In France, the Normande has always been known for its unsurpassed marbling quality, flavour and tenderness, and regularly wins blind tests for its taste. A special label for Normande meat enjoys great popularity in major supermarkets. In the US, Normande bulls have won growth tests at various test stations and carcasses have often ranked first at major beef shows.

Characteristics

The Normande is a red and white cow with occasional sometimes widespread areas of brown hair. Typically, the brown hair has the look of tiger stripes, or brindles, interspersed with the red spots, and there is some degree of balance between the three different hues. However, one colour often dominates, and there is a different name for the dominance of each colour.
The representative Normande is red and white (with brown brindles), this is said to be “blond” others are “quail” - when the white dominates, “brindled” - predominantly brown and “trouted” which is a multitude of brown spots on the skin underneath white hair. Some bulls appear black but it is really brown hair, the Normande is homozygous red breed.

Calves do not display their brindles until a few weeks after birth, and altogether, Normande cattle tend to darken as they age.

Normandes are a medium frame size breed with most cows weighing 1,200 to 1,500 lbs. and bulls 2,000 to 2,400 lbs. They possess excellent body depth and spring of rib while maintaining exceptional body length. The cattle are also very clean fronted and carry a strong topline.

Normande females reach sexual maturity early and have good fertility, mammary conformation, mothering ability and production longevity. They have large pelvic areas and calve easily with calves showing excellent vigour and most birth weights in the 70 to 95 lb. range. In France, milk production averages 14,000 lbs. per lactation with 4.2 % butterfat and 3.5 % protein.

Because of the breed's high muscle mass to bone ratio and their small heads, the Normande has a high percentage yield at slaughter. The carcass is very lean but marbles readily and purebred Normande steers will easily grade choice at 1,250 lbs. The Normande breed won’t produce bulging rear quarters of cheap ground round but will increase the length and width of the top priced loin area cuts.

Statistics

  • Ultimate grazers that can be used for either beef and dairy production
  • Incredible feed converters
  • Rich milk for cheese production and good growth rate in calves
  • Ideal for dairy crossbreeding
  • Fertility
  • Calving ease
  • Strength
  • High percentage yield at slaughter

    Comparative

    Growth Rates
    Recent bull tests have shown that this rapid growth rate will continue on high roughage feed. Normande bulls have topped the St. Croix Valley Bull Test at River Falls, Wisconsin in both years that they've been entered. In 1991 a Normande bull set an all time station record 4.93 lb. ADG and also had a 3.64 lb. WDA. The second place bull that year was also a Normande. In the 1992 test a Normande bull again topped the field with a 4.68 lb. ADG and a 3.49 lb. WDA. The 140 day test annually features 100 bulls from 8 to 10 different beef breeds fed a corn silage based high roughage ration. Studies in France have documented 5.0 feed conversion rates on the same type of diet.

    In the 1990 and 1991 Montana 4-H Steer of Merit Carcass Contests, three 7/8 Normande steers placed in the top 10 out of the 1,000 steers entered annually including crossbreds. A 1991 Normande steer had a 16.2 in. rib eye, a 0.15 in. backfat, and a yield grade of 0.99.

    North American Normande Association

    Normande cows on high forage feeding systems average between 14,000 and 15,000 lbs of milk per lactation at 3.6 % protein and 4.4 % fat. Many cows produce more than 22,000 lbs and some reach 30,000 lbs. These results do not reflect the genetic originality of the breed: more than 90 % of the individuals carry the B Kappa Caseine gene and 82 % of AI Bulls have the BB Genotype. The levels of casein beta and kappa in the milk are known to improve the curdling quality of the milk for cheese manufacturing (speed and firmness of gel). In addition, Normande milk presents favorable calcium/phosphate ratio and casein miscella of small diameter, all of which result in yields of cheese 15 to 20 % higher depending on the type of fabrication/manufacture.

    www.normandegenetics.com

    TRIAL IN CASTLELYONS
    Three years ago Waterford Co-Op decided to look at ways of helping their suppliers improve profit margins on their farms. Three batches of heifers were bought in, Normande, Montbeliarde, and High RBI Dutch Holsteins. Their performances were measured alongside the Castlelyons animals. Cows calved down in Spring of '96'. Milk yield in 1997 for Normande is heading for over 1,000 gals. and with protein levels in the region of 3.6 percent on 500 kgs meal. The trial work being carried out by Waterford also looks at the financial implications of each breed from the average Waterford supplier based on 80 acres with 42,000 gallon quota and male progeny carried to beef. In estimating the profit implications, the following assumptions were made, dual purpose cattle achieving a factory price premium of £100 over ordinary Freisiens; Dutch cattle carrying a price penalty of £30 per head over own breed and no butterfat levy imposed. The comparisons show that the Normande herd provide for and increase in net profit of £6,277, the Montbeliarde herd increase was £4,796 and the high RBI herd increase was £1,748 over own bred cattle.

    Irish Normade Dual Purpose Cattle Breed Society

    Distribution

    Normandes have been exported world-wide but have received their greatest acceptance in South America where they were introduced in the 1890's. Total numbers there now exceed 4 million purebreds plus countless Normande crossbreds. Columbia alone has 1.6 million purebreds with the rest mainly in Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay and Uruguay. They are also growing in countries such as Madagascar, the US, Mexico, Belgium, Switzerland, Great Britain and Ireland.

    References (the above information was cited from the following sites)

    normandeassociation.com
    www.normandegenetics.com
    www.ansi.okstate.edu
    www.britishnormandecattle.co.uk
    CR Normande Cattle
    Irish Normade Dual Purpose Cattle Breed Society
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    PROMOTING AND IMPROVING THE NORMANDE BREED IN NORTH AMERICA

    Our Mission

    As the official breed Association for Normande cattle in the United States the purpose of the North American Normande Association is to provide breeders of Normande cattle an official organization through which they can register their animals so as to ensure the integrity of Normande genetics in the United States. The second purpose of the North American Normande Association is to promote the Normande breed in both the dairy and beef industries. The third purpose of the North American Normande Association is to collect and record official performance data on Normande cattle so as to improve our selection and breeding programs. This purpose includes providing tangible evidence of the genetic and profitable contributions the Normande breed can make to the dairy and beef industries.

    The goals of the North American Normande Association are two-fold. Our first goal is to increase the genetic influence Normande have upon the dairy and beef industries. Our second goal is to provide breeders of Normande cattle Association programs that recognize the top Normande genetics and the breeders who develop those top genetics.

    With your interest in the Normande breed coupled with our benefits we encourage you to become a member of the North American Normande Association.

    become a member!

    WHAT IS A NORMANDE? (The dual purpose breed)

    The Association, and this website, are a clearinghouse for all sorts of information on the Normande breed in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, as well as the repository for breed registration and genetic records that Normande enthusiasts require for improvement and popularization of the breed. You'll find information on the breed itself, with specific points on raising Normandes as dairy or as beef cattle; on the history of Normandes on this continent and worldwide; photos, and a list of Normande breeders.

    LEARN MORE

    MEMBERSHIPS, RENEWALS & CERTIFICATIONS

    Have you ever wondered what the color codes on the registration application are referring to as you try to decide what you should put in the “Coat Color” box? We have all your questions covered in our extensive Programs and Services section!

    VIEW MORE INFORMATION

    RULES, CLASSES & FORMS

    General rules, judging, show information and definitions, class rules and all entry forms can be found here! Memberships and submission of breed photos and classified ads will also be in this detailed section.

    VIEW SHOW INFORMATION

    NORMANDE BREEDER'S DIRECTORY

    The site is also where you'll find the full N.A.N.A. Breeders Directory, breeder-submitted photos of the finest Normandes from each farm, classified ads with Normande animals, related products, and services; our own Store with Normande calendars, caps, and other merchandise; information on our Junior Breeder programs; forms, registrations and much, much more!

    VIEW BREEDER'S DIRECTORY

    THE ULTIMATE GRAZER | SUPERIOR MILK | GOURMET BEEF | CARCASS QUALITY

    Sours: https://www.normandeassociation.com/
    Champion Bulls of Different Breeds at Royal Highland Show 2021

    The Normande breed is noted for:

    • High fertility
    • High milk solids (breed average 3.62% protein)
    • A desirable kappa casein profile (the ‘cheese gene’)
    • They are strong, compact cattle with good bull calf value (carcasses yield >55%).

    The countryside of Normandy, the home of the Normande cow, is very similar to South West England and South West Wales. For several centuries, farmers from Normandy have developed this exceptional breed on the pastures of North Western France. Raised on rough forage, the Normande is very well known for quality in both dairy and beef production. Normande milk components are the best for making cheese. Carcass yield and marbling are superior. The Normande is a true dual purpose cow: unlike specialised breeds, it has preserved hardiness and breeding qualities, such as fertility, calving ease, feed and leg conformation, feed conversion and genetic diversity. Normande cows on high forage feeding systems average between 6,400 and 7,000kgs of milk per lactation at 3.6% protein and 4.4% fat. On more intensive systems many cows produce more than 10,000 Kgs milk and some reach 13,400kgs. The levels of casein beta and kappa casein in the milk are known to improve the curdling quality of the milk for cheese manufacturing.

    Click here to view the Normande Bulls available in our herd today…

    Sours: https://www.hyvig.com/genetic-products/optional-third-breeds/normande/

    Bulls normande

    Normande

    Breed of cattle

    Vachesnormandes.jpg
    Conservation statusFAO (2007): not at risk[1]: 144 
    Country of originFrance
    Distributionworld-wide
    Weight
    Height
    Skin colourwhite
    Coatred- or black-pied
    Horn statushorned in both sexes

    The Normande is a breed of dairy cattle from the Normandy region of north-west France. It is raised principally for its milk, which is high in fat and suitable for making butter and cheese, but also for its meat, which is marbled and good-flavoured. It is a world breed: it has been exported to many countries and is present on all continents.

    History[edit]

    The Normande originated in Normandy in the early nineteenth century. It resulted from cross-breeding of local dairy breeds including the Augeronne, the Cauchoise and the Cotentine (all now extinct) with animals of the Durham breed (later known as the Shorthorn), which were imported from England from 1836 onwards.[3][4] The French population of the Alderney breed was also absorbed into the Normande.[5]: 192  A herd-book was started in 1883.[6]Performance testing for bulls was introduced in 1952.[4][5]: 262 

    The Normande is a significant breed in France. In the 1960s there were some 4.5 million head, representing about a quarter of the national herd.[5]: 262  In 2005 the total number in France was estimated at approximately 2.1 million.[3]

    The Normande has been exported to many countries and is present on all continents.[7][8] Exports to South America began in 1877. Colombia has the largest population of Normande cattle outside France, reported at about 380,000.[7] In Brazil, where the Normande was first imported in 1923, it has been cross-bred with zebuine cattle to create a hybrid, the Normanzu.[5]: 139 

    Characteristics[edit]

    The Normande is a large-bodied animal: cows usually weigh 700–800 kg, and bulls up to 1100 kg. The coat is usually red-pied or speckled, but may also be black-pied or blonde. The head is often white, and the surround of the eyes is commonly dark, giving a "spectacled" appearance. The skin is white and muzzle is dark.[3]

    The Normande is long-lived and calves easily. In Normandy it is usually kept on grass, but it adapts well to other environments. It has good resistance to sunshine and to extremes of heat and of altitude. It is well adapted to mechanical milking.[3]

    Use[edit]

    The Normande is a dual-purpose dairy breed, kept principally for its milk. Annual yield is 6595 litres in a lactation of 316 days. The milk has 4.4% fat and 3.6% protein. It is particularly suitable for making butter and cheese.[3] The meat has good flavour and is marbled with fat.[3]

    References[edit]

    1. ^Barbara Rischkowsky, D. Pilling (eds.) (2007). List of breeds documented in the Global Databank for Animal Genetic Resources, annex to The State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. ISBN 9789251057629. Accessed December 2016.
    2. ^ abcdMarie Dervillé, Stéphane Patin, Laurent Avon (2009). Races bovines de France: origine, standard, sélection (in French). Paris: Éditions France Agricole. ISBN 9782855571515.
    3. ^ abcdefÉtude de la race bovine: Normande (in French). Bureau des Ressources Génétiques. Archived 29 August 2009.
    4. ^ abHistorique (in French). Organisme de Sélection en Race Normande. Accessed December 2016.
    5. ^ abcdValerie Porter, Lawrence Alderson, Stephen J.G. Hall, D. Phillip Sponenberg (2016). Mason's World Encyclopedia of Livestock Breeds and Breeding (sixth edition). Wallingford: CABI. ISBN 9781780647944.
    6. ^Breed data sheet: Normande/France. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed December 2016.
    7. ^ abTransboundary breed: Normande. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed December 2016.
    8. ^La race Normande dans le monde (in French). Organisme de Sélection en Race Normande. Accessed December 2016.
    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normande
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