Ford explorer ss

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Cargo (Std/Max):

18/88 cu.ft.

Pros

  • Three powertrain choices
  • Excellent interior room
  • Available AWD

Cons

  • Cabin materials could be nicer
  • Middling fuel economy

Ford Explorer Expert Review

Bob Hernandez

The Ford Explorer is an archetype. In the model line's three-plus decades of existence, it has helped cultivate the massive popularity of SUVs. Now in its sixth generation, the Explorer has moved from a FWD-based transverse engine layout to a RWD longitudinal-engine unibody platform. The three-row midsizer slots above the Edge and below the Expedition in Ford's SUV lineup.

  • Sporty looking ST-Line trim slots above the XLT and below the Limited trim level
  • Explorer ST now comes standard with RWD; AWD is available
  • Explorer Platinum and King Ranch get standard 10.1-inch touchscreen, multi-contour seats, 14-speaker B&O sound system, and 400-hp turbo V-6 from the Explorer ST
  • Explorer Timberline gets second-row bench option
  • New seat trim on Explorer XLT Sport Appearance package with Ebony seat bolsters and Light Slate inserts
  • Two new exterior paint colors: Stone Blue and Burgundy Velvet

The redesigned sixth generation Explorer, which began with the 2020 model year, is a fetching machine, boasting a more upright greenhouse and nice proportions. It's a pleasing evolution of Ford's design language. Interiors offer lots of features but subpar fit and finish, with the bane of cheap plastics and low-quality leather present.

Drives in the Explorer XLT, ST, and Limited Hybrid revealed a satisfying ride with proper compliance and poise. The lineup's three powertrains offer a commendable blend of capability, performance, and efficiency. But the Explorer placed eighth in our three-row SUV comparison because rivals were more refined.

All 2022 Explorers use a 10-speed automatic transmission.

Base, XLT, ST-Line, Limited, Timberline

Drivetrain: RWD or AWD

Engine: 2.3-liter turbo-four

Horsepower/Torque: 300 hp/310 lb-ft

Efficiency (city/highway): 20-21/27-28 mpg

Acceleration (0-60 mph): 6.8 seconds (2021 Explorer XLT)

Limited Hybrid

Drivetrain: RWD or AWD

Engine: 3.3-liter V-6 and electric motor

Horsepower/Torque: 318 hp/322 lb-ft

Efficiency (city/highway): 23-27/26-28 mpg

Acceleration (0-60 mph): 7.7 seconds (2021 model)

ST, Platinum, King Ranch

Drivetrain: RWD or AWD

Engine: 3.0-liter turbo-V-6

Horsepower/Torque: 400 hp/415 lb-ft

Efficiency (city/highway): 18/24 mpg (2021 EPA estimate)

Acceleration (0-60 mph): 5.3 seconds (2021 Explorer ST)

Ford says its Explorer Timberline is "the most off-road-capable Explorer ever." The Timberline model is equipped for leaving the pavement with Bridgestone Dueler all-terrain tires, a small suspension lift, revised bumper fascia for improved approach and departure angles, and steel skid plates. Its steering, drivetrain, and suspension have been tuned for going off the beaten path, and if you get into trouble in the Timberline, there's a set of Red Ember tow hooks in front that are rated at 150 percent of the truck's gross vehicle weight.

The Timberline also features a new Forged Green Metallic exterior color, exterior blackout treatments and orange accent striping, and gloss-black 18-inch wheels. Its cabin boasts easy-cleaning ActiveX vinyl and cloth seats, distinctive green upholstery with orange accent stitching, and standard heated front seats and steering wheel.

Each model of the 2022 Explorer lineup earned a five-star overall safety rating from the NHTSA, the administration's highest grade, although only four-star ratings in rollover resistance testing. The IIHS hasn't published any ratings yet for the 2022 Explorer, but the previous year's model was a 2021 Top Safety Pick+. The SUV was given mostly Good marks by the institute, exceptions being Acceptable ratings on headlights on all trims for some glare and visibility issues and an Acceptable rating for child seat anchors.

Standard 2022 Explorer active safety technologies include automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, lane departure warning, and automatic high beams. Adaptive cruise control, lane centering, and automatic parking assist are available features.

Cabin space in the 2022 Explorer compares favorably to the Toyota Highlander. As is typical in this segment, though, the third row feels tight.

Cargo space (behind first/second/third rows):

2022 Explorer: 87.8/47.9/18.2 cubic feet

2021 Highlander: 84.3/48.4/16.0 cubic feet

Headroom (first/second/third rows):

2022 Explorer: 40.7/40.5/38.9 inches

2021 Highlander: 38.4/39.4/36.1 inches

Legroom (first/second/third rows):

2022 Explorer: 43.0/39.0/32.2 inches

2021 Highlander: 40.4/41.0/27.7 inches

Standard equipment on the base model 2022 Explorer includes LED headlights and taillights, a power liftgate, three-zone climate control, and an infotainment system with six speakers and an 8.0-inch touchscreen. The Explorer XLT adds push-button start, 6.5-inch instrument cluster display, first row heated seats, and second row USB ports.

The Explorer Limited gets a big tech bump, gaining power folding mirrors, rain sensing wipers, a heated steering wheel, heated second row seats, remote start, wireless device charging, and 14 speakers. LED foglights are standard on the Explorer Timberline, a hands-free power liftgate and power folding second and third rows are standard on the Explorer ST, and puddle lamps and a power tilting and telescoping steering wheel column are standard on the Explorer King Ranch.

Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/cars/ford/explorer/

The 2020 Ford Explorer ST pictured here can get to 60 mph in a scant 5.2 seconds, which is only a tenth of a second quicker than a 1991 GMC Typhoon could. How many of us would have thought back at the dawn of the grunge decade that the utterly outrageous GMC would be a harbinger of the future? We'd guess zero. At the time, the Typhoon and its pickup brother, the Syclone, were bizarre, out-of-the-blue-sky anomalies. But look around now: The market is chockablock with high-powered, hunkered-down SUVs. The Explorer ST, like the Typhoon, is powered by a turbocharged V-6. Both are all-wheel drive. And both eschew chrome and brightness in a bid to look at least a little bit menacing. A note to Ford's communications staffers, who are no doubt less than thrilled about us equating their new hotness with a nearly 30-year-old GM product: Don't worry; this part will be over soon.

HIGHS: Plentiful torque, much-improved interior, less dowdy than before.

The Explorer ST is not actually like the GMC Typhoon. For one thing, the Ford isn't named after a storm capable of creating widespread calamity and death. It doesn't even get its own name, just its own suffix: ST. And before we go all independent-music-store snobby about applying that suffix to this three-row SUV, let us remember that the sum total of the history of ST in the U.S. before Ford started slapping it on SUVs was only two cars: the Focus ST, which was an admirable effort, and the Fiesta ST, which, living up to its name, was a party on wheels, a splash in the waves, as precious as Tuesday afternoon drunkenness.

Also, compared with the Typhoon, the Explorer ST has twice as many doors, two more seats, two fewer drum brakes, six more forward gears, one fewer live axle, and wheels that are five inches greater in diameter. By our measurement, it will travel seven more miles for each gallon of fuel consumed. And the cheeky Explorer ST will give you a butt massage (front-seat passengers only).

LOWS: Needlessly heavy steering, uncoordinated primary controls, pricey—especially with summer tires.

This silver ST is the first new Explorer that we've had the chance to take to the test track. But all 2020 Explorers benefit from an entirely new platform, which manages the nice trick of growing only an inch longer while riding on a wheelbase that expands by more than six inches. Just as impressive is that our well-equipped ST's curb weight was 127 pounds lighter than a 2017 Explorer Platinum's. It's still a plump 4853 pounds, but we're trying to be encouraging here. And that weight is better distributed between the front and rear than the last Explorer's was; the new one carries only 51.3 percent of its heft on its front axle, compared with 54.9 in the last generation. That's in part because this Explorer has its engine mounted longitudinally instead of transversely. Also, the base model is now rear-wheel drive instead of front-drive. All STs are all-wheel drive.

The new Explorer's short overhangs, taut musculature, and plunging roofline give it a look that is both sportier and more elegant than the outgoing model's. Black 21-inch wheels contribute to the appearance of our ST. They're part of the $995 ST Street package that also includes red-painted sliding brake calipers, front and rear; larger brake rotors; and high-temp seals in the braking system. Opt instead for the $1595 High Perform­ance pack and you get the same upgrades plus more aggressive brake pads. And to really drive home the sportiness of the thing, Ford added a set of $2500 Michelin Latitude Sport 3 summer tires. All other Explorers come with all-seasons.

VERDICT: Probably not the best Explorer, definitely not the best-handling ST, but compelling because it's unexpected.

Compared with the Platinum, the ST rides on stiffer springs (10 percent more so in front and 8 percent in the rear), retuned dampers, and fatter anti-roll bars. Ford also tweaked the electric-assist steering system to deliver a weightier feel. And the twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6, effectively the same engine used in certain Lincoln models, delivers 400 horsepower and 415 pound-feet of torque. The Platinum uses a 365-hp version of this engine, while XLT Explorers make do with a 300-hp turbocharged 2.3-liter inline-four. Limited models use either the four-cylinder or a 318-hp hybrid based on a 3.3-liter V-6.

The ST's engine might be a half-liter smaller than the old Explorer's optional twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6, but it makes 35 more horsepower and 65 more pound-feet of torque. Predictably then, the new vehicle is quicker. And more important, it feels substantially quicker on the road. Once the 10-speed automatic decides on the optimal gear, this rig moves out with surprising authority. That transmission, the only one available on any new Explorer, does occasionally dither, swapping gears multiple times when a single change would suffice. We find that switching the drive mode to Sport helps alleviate some of the transmission's indecisiveness and sharpens throttle response to just this side of touchy. Our only other powertrain quibble is that the engine note is less of a mechanical symphony than a moan. And Sport mode merely amplifies that noise.

The stiffer suspension and summer tires deliver at the test track. The ST pulls to a stop from 70 mph in 161 feet. Most three-row SUVs take at least an additional 10 feet to get that done. And the ST circled our 300-foot skidpad with 0.86 g of lateral grip. That is, of course, more than non-sportified, all-season-tire-wearing three-row SUVs can manage—they tend to return figures in the low to mid-0.80s—but we expected more out of a vehicle with big summer tires mounted to a relatively stiff suspension.

On the road, the ST's ride is not objectionable, but there's no denying that the vehicle's sporting intentions and big wheels give it a heavy-footed feeling. Despite the grip of the tires, the starch in the suspension, and a structure that feels rock solid, the Explorer ST is not as coordinated as we'd hoped it would be, either. The brakes on our test car were grabby, and it took more effort on our part to achieve smooth, consistent stops than it should have taken. The steering action is heavy through the thick-rimmed wheel, but it feels artificially so. There's none of the buildup of forces that, in the best sporting machines, telegraph the status of grip to the driver. Combine that with a transmission that likes to let the engine rest at every opportunity, requiring multiple downshifts and turbo spool-up to get into the thrust, and the Explorer ST is not a natural performance vehicle. Rather, it's a normal vehicle with extra grip and a lot of horsepower.

There's still much to like about the overall redo of this normal vehicle. The interi­or of the previous Explorer was a dismal affair. Its high beltline made us feel as though we were sitting in a giant soaker tub constructed of cheap black plastic panels. The new interior, though still a composition entirely in black in this example, is a pleasant place to spend some time. The apparent quality of the materials is at least on par with the best in the Explorer's mainstream competitors. There are only a few pieces of questionable refinement, such as the panel on the center stack surrounding the climate-control knobs. It's hard, hollow, and ungrained, making it feel and look cheap. Such a piece wouldn't be off-putting in an XLT, which starts at less than $40,000. But it's a little harder to swallow on our test vehicle, which carried an MSRP of $62,020.

At least the ST comes well equipped for its $55,835 base price, including niceties such as automated parking, a wireless charging pad, a navigation system, automatic high-beam headlights, rain-sensing wipers, heating for the steering wheel and the front- and second-row seats, ventilation for the front seats, remote start, a Wi-Fi hotspot, and leather upholstery. Front-seat massage, a 10.1-inch center screen, and a 14-speaker audio system added $995. That portrait-oriented infotainment screen is useful, even if, standing proud of the dash, it looks conspicuously like the mysterious black monoliths from 2001: A Space Odyssey. For another $1695, our test vehicle came with a dual-pane sunroof. That's nice for brightening the interior, but it eats up more than two inches of precious headroom for second-row passengers, making it barely tolerable for adults to sit there. In fact, with the sunroof, headroom in the third row is slightly better than in the second, which is great except that Ford achieved this in part by slamming the bottom cushion down on the floor, putting passengers in a knees-up posture that they will resent. Cargo space is ample, roughly halfway between the capacity of a Mazda CX-9 on the small end and that of a Chevrolet Traverse on the big.

Perhaps the Platinum model, with most of the ST's power and none of its overt sporting intentions, would be more to our liking. Maybe we've gotten soft in the three decades since the launch of the Typhoon, but we appreciate the basic Explorer package more than we do the integration of its perform­ance upgrades.


Counterpoints

I relish any opportunity to shake my fist at the SUV takeover, and the Explorer ST—as impressive as it is—is an easy target. The extra weight and height that come with a package like this are the enemies of performance, ostensibly the ST’s primary mission. So if Ford’s engineers were able to make this tall, nearly 5000-pound family bus corner this well and accelerate this quickly, then imagine what they could have done with this platform and powertrain if they had fitted a lower, lighter sedan body on top of it and called it the Taurus SHO. Sure, the Chevy SS was a flop, but the Dodge Charger could really use a good crosstown rival. It’s an alternate universe I wish I lived in. —Joey Capparella, staff editor

All expensive Fords—Lincolns included—have the same problem: They simply cost too much. They’re priced as if they were all-around more-premium products than they are. Just look inside this thing. The hard, oddly grained plastic that lines most of the lower half of the interior not only looks as if it had been pulled straight from the old Explorer, it also resembles a popcorn ceiling and is about as appealing as asbestos. And I know what you’ll say: “But this one is based on a rear-drive platform!” Sure, but turn-in is a little doughy, and the front and rear axles roll at different rates. And why does the front end look as though someone punched it flat? Durango SRT, please. —Alexander Stoklosa, staff editor

Specifications

Specifications

2020 Ford Explorer ST

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 6-passenger, 4-door hatchback

PRICE AS TESTED
$62,020 (base price: $55,835)

ENGINE TYPE
twin-turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 24-valve V-6, iron-and-aluminum block and aluminum heads,  direct fuel injection
Displacement
180 in3, 2956 cm3
Power
400 hp @ 5500 rpm
Torque
415 lb-ft @ 3500 rpm

TRANSMISSION
10-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): multilink/multilink
Brakes (F/R): 14.3-in vented disc/13.8-in vented disc
Tires: Michelin Latitude Sport 3, 275/45R-21 107Y

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 119.1 in
Length: 199.3 in
Width: 78.9 in
Height: 70.2 in
Passenger volume: 149 ft3
Cargo volume: 18 ft3
Curb weight: 4853 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS
60 mph: 5.2 sec
100 mph: 13.3 sec
140 mph: 35.0 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 5.9 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 3.2 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 3.8 sec
¼-mile: 13.8 sec @ 101 mph
Top speed (govenor limited): 146 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 161 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.86 g
*stability-control-inhibited

C/D FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 21 mpg

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 20/18/24 mpg 

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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a28789910/2020-ford-explorer-st-by-the-numbers/
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Ford Explorer ST (U625) specs

I guess we could make the assumption that the ST Explorer is a 'tweener SUV: slightly faster than a rear-wheel-drive R/T Durango and only very slightly slower than a SRT 392 Durango. Is that fair?

As a general rule, 20% drivetrain loss for Ford, and 10% for Chrysler (especially post-1998). The Explorer ST (RWD version) may have a "better" power-to-weight ratio in theory, but in reality it's barely even a Durango R/T competitor. Even the pricing suggests it's a rival for a lightly loaded Durango R/T.

Horsepower ratings:
400 × 0.80 = 320 whp (Ford Explorer ST, some King Ranch and Platinum models)
360 × 0.90 = 324 whp (Dodge Durango R/T, some Citadel models)
475 × 0.90 = 428 whp (Dodge Durango SRT 392)

SUV weights are typically 200 lb apart for RWD vs AWD, so 4500/320 = 14.1 lb/whp for Explorer.

R/T Durango is 5100/324 = 15.7 lb/whp, and the 12.9 lb/whp belongs to SRT 392.

14.1 sounds like a happy, perfect little middle for that Explorer. It's still a fast crossover though!

Sours: https://fastestlaps.com/models/ford-explorer-st
Ford Explorer ST vs Dodge Durango SRT Drag Race - Can a $600 Tune Beat America's Fastest 3-Row SUV?

Overview

If you're shopping for a new mid-size SUV for 2021, Ford is hoping that its Explorer will make its way to your driveway. It offers three rows of seats and plentiful room for hauling cargo, and it comes equipped with much of the connectivity and safety features that are on most buyers wish lists. The base and XLT models come standard with a turbocharged four-cylinder engine and rear-wheel drive, but all-wheel drive is optional. Optional is a hybrid powertrain, and the top-spec Platinum and sporty ST models come with a twin-turbo V-6. Overall, the Explorer is a decent choice, but rivals such as the Kia Telluride, the Hyundai Palisade, and the Mazda CX-9 offer more polish.

What's New for 2021?

Ford has made a few tweaks to its mid-size crossover for 2021, such as making heated seats standard on the XLT, offering a heated steering wheel as an optional feature on that model, and including an eight-way power-adjustable front passenger's seat on the Limited, ST, and Platinum models. A Sport Appearance package is now available on the XLT trim, and it includes 20-inch aluminum wheels that are coated in Carbonized Gray paint. In addition to the upgraded wheels, the package also brings a mesh grille with Carbonized Gray accents as well as unique lower-body cladding, dual exhaust outlets, Light Slate–colored interior upholstery, faux skid plates, and more. A new cargo organizer is optional on XLT, Limited, and ST models; the Platinum trim receives this feature as standard. A high-end King Ranch trim joins the lineup and features unique mahogany-colored leather upholstery; a sporty Enthusiast ST trim is also new for 2021 and provides the performance of the more expensive ST trim with less features and a lower price. Off-road enthusiasts may find the new Timberline trim interesting; it features a lifted suspension, all-terrain tires, and more rugged exterior styling cues. The hybrid powertrain is now available on the Platinum trim and, speaking of Platinum, buyers can now order a rear-wheel drive version of the Explorer's top trim. Ford also says an all-electric variant of the Explorer is on the way, but we don't expect to see that until at least the 2022 model year.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

We think the mid-level Limited model is the best Explorer for the money. While the hybrid makes sense for people who can take advantage of its lofty EPA-rated city mpg, we found the standard turbocharged four-cylinder engine to be sufficiently potent and more efficient on the highway. It can tow a sizeable 5300 pounds when equipped with the towing package. We'd also add all-wheel drive for $1920. Apart from that, we think the Limited trim's desirable standard features should suffice. These include a 12-speaker B&O audio system, 20-inch wheels, a heated and power-adjustable steering wheel, leather upholstery, a power-folding third row, and upgraded driver assists such as adaptive cruise control.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

Base, XLT, and Limited trims come with a 300-hp turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine, and it motivates the Explorer with authority. The lead-foot drivers among us will prefer either the Platinum model, with its 365-hp twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6, or the sporty Explorer ST, which uses a 400-hp version of the same engine. A hybrid joined the Explorer lineup for 2020. It pairs a 3.3-liter V-6 engine with an electric motor for a combined output of 318 horsepower. When properly equipped, the Explorer can tow up to 5600 pounds. The Explorer rides on an all-new rear-wheel-drive platform, but all-wheel drive is still optional. A 10-speed automatic transmission is standard across the board. Ride and handling are agreeable and composed but far from entertaining; the Explorer ST is far more athletic, and its extra power and stiffer suspension make it a real performance SUV.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Due to its myriad powertrain and drivetrain combinations, the 2021 Explorer has varying EPA fuel-economy ratings. The rear-drive hybrid model is rated as the thriftiest overall, with estimates of up to 27 mpg city and 29 mpg highway. Adding all-wheel drive reduces the hybrid's ratings by 3 and 4 mpg, respectively. We tested one on our 200-mile highway route, where it managed only 24 mpg. Comparatively, the 400-hp Explorer ST earned 25 mpg in our testing, which beat its EPA rating by 1. We also tested the four-cylinder Explorer with all-wheel drive. The government estimates that version will earn 20 mpg city and 27 highway; we saw 28 mpg.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

While the interior design may border on uninspired, the Explorer's cabin is functional and comfortable—at least for those in the first two rows. Getting into the standard third row is now easier thanks to a new mechanism that moves the second-row seat out of the way at the touch of a button. Once back there, however, older kids and adults will find that the seat is too close to the floor to be comfortable. Rivals such as the Chevy Traverse and the Volkswagen Atlas provide more comfort in the third row. We managed to fit four carry-on suitcases behind the Ford's third row, and we fit a total of 31 bags with both back rows folded flat.

Infotainment and Connectivity

An 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment is standard and includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capability and a Wi-Fi hotspot. The system is both attractive and responsive but not as intuitive as we'd like. A rotatory controller would help in that regard. To get the optional 10.1-inch vertically oriented screen, you'll need to upgrade to either the Platinum or ST. Still, every model is available with voice-activated navigation as well as a rear-seat entertainment system. Apart from the base Explorer, a 12-speaker B&O audio system comes standard.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The 2021 Explorer received a five-star safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) but missed out on a Top Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) due to a merely Acceptable score in the small-overlap front crash test. Ford outfits every Explorer with a host of standard driver-assistance technology and offers upgrades such as self-parking assist. Key safety features include:

  • Standard forward-collision warning and automated emergency braking
  • Standard blind-spot monitoring and rear-cross-traffic alert
  • Standard lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Ford provides wholly average limited and powertrain warranties that align with most competitors' plans. However, the company doesn't provide the complimentary maintenance that Toyota and Chevy do.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance

Specifications

Specifications

2020 Ford Explorer ST

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 6-passenger, 4-door hatchback

PRICE AS TESTED
$62,020 (base price: $55,835)

ENGINE TYPE
twin-turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 24-valve V-6, iron-and-aluminum block and aluminum heads,  direct fuel injection
Displacement
180 in3, 2956 cm3
Power
400 hp @ 5500 rpm
Torque
415 lb-ft @ 3500 rpm

TRANSMISSION
10-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): multilink/multilink
Brakes (F/R): 14.3-in vented disc/13.8-in vented disc
Tires: Michelin Latitude Sport 3, 275/45R-21 107Y

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 119.1 in
Length: 199.3 in
Width: 78.9 in
Height: 70.2 in
Passenger volume: 149 ft3
Cargo volume: 18 ft3
Curb weight: 4853 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS
60 mph: 5.2 sec
100 mph: 13.3 sec
140 mph: 35.0 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 5.9 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 3.2 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 3.8 sec
¼-mile: 13.8 sec @ 101 mph
Top speed (govenor limited): 146 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 161 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.86 g
*stability-control-inhibited

C/D FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 21 mpg

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 20/18/24 mpg 

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More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/ford/explorer

Explorer ss ford

BMW X3M Comp Spanks Ford Explorer ST, Crumbles Under Pressure Against Camaro SS

No matter how much power the Bavarians put in these things, they will always be too large, too heavy, and too brick-like to trouble a decent sports car with similar technical specifications. They will always be the big fish in a small pond, with the pond being the SUVsegment. And even there, they might have to run and hide whenever the JeepGrand Cherokee Trackhawk shows up.

That's all the more true for the smallest of the BMW M SUVs, the X3 M Competition. The model gets a twin-turbo three-liter straight-six engine producing 503 hp (510 PS) and 479 lb-ft (650 Nm) of maximum torque, all channeled through an eight-speed automatic transmission to all four wheels via the proprietary xDrive all-wheel-drive system. Impressive numbers, no doubt, but let's not forget it also weighs about 4,597 lbs (2,085 kg), which isn't necessarily fringing on the obese territory these days, but it still generates a lot of inertia that needs to be overcome.

Lining up against a FordExplorer ST, then, should make for a good warm-up race. With its twin-turbo 3.0-liter V6 making 400 hp, the American SUV poses no threat to the BMW. Quite surprisingly, though, the ST is lighter than the X3 M (by more than 200 lbs), but we all know it's not going to make a difference.

The first race between the two looks even worse than it needed to for the Ford model. The driver failed to build up boost at the start, so he found himself lingering there for almost a full second after the lights had gone out, presumably still trying to launch the Explorer properly. Over in the other lane, the X3 M Competitiondriver managed a 0.06-second reaction which meant the gap between the two was unsightly large.

Whether they asked for it or not, the Ford Explorer ST gets a rematch against the Bimmer, but even though the roles at the start switch this time, the X3 M Competition still has more than it needs to catch the ST and win comfortably.

The third race was run without any opponent, and funnily enough, it was the X3's quickest on that day: 12.147 seconds with a trap speed of 114 mph (183 km/h). With a Chevrolet CamaroSS 1LE lurking around posting similar figures, a race between the two seemed like a pretty mouth-watering proposition.

Unfortunately, the X3 M Competition driver must have felt the weight of the entire BMWcompany pushing down on his shoulders, so the pressure got to him. He started building boost too early, so eventually, the brakes couldn't hold the car back and he had to let go. Unfortunately, it was way too early, so the race was lost right from the start. A bit anti-climactic, but we can find some comfort in the fact that, when it comes back, the X3 is going to be tuned and sporting even more power. We could leave it there and end on a positive note, but we have to mention all of the facts: that will likely happen about two months from now.

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Sours: https://www.autoevolution.com/news/bmw-x3m-comp-spanks-ford-explorer-st-crumbles-under-pressure-against-camaro-ss-170180.html
2019 Ford Explorer XLT 4x4 - Exterior And Interior Walkaround - 2019 Montreal Auto Show

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