Yamaha g16 solenoid

Yamaha g16 solenoid DEFAULT

Solenoids

SO99-000 - 12 Volt Solenoid, NLA

NO LONGER AVAILABLE +++ Use SO66-050 +++ Genuine New Old Stock 12 volt, 6 Terminal Reversing Solenoid with silver contacts for 1982 to 1989 Yamaha G1 2 cycle gas +++ Will replace White-Rogers 6 terminal 586 series reversing solenoid on 1990s Cushman GT-1 and UTV MAX electric carts.

Part Number: SO99-000

SO99-090 - Solenoid Repair Kit

Solenoid Repair Kit for 1982 to 1989 Yamaha G1, 2 cycle gas and electric +++ Contains two plastic end caps, one contact plate, one contact plunger, one spacer, one spring and hardware.

Part Number: SO99-090

SO99-030 - 36 Volt Solenoid, NLA

NO LONGER AVAILABLE, Use SO22-040 +++ Solenoid for 1985 to 1991 Yamaha G2 electric only, 36 Volt with 4 Terminals and silver contacts.

Part Number: SO99-030

SO55-000 - 12 Volt Solenoid

Heavy Duty 12 Volt Solenoid with silver contacts for Nordskog +++ 1986 to 1987 Taylor-Dunn model R-680 truck +++ 1990 to 1995 Hyundai gas +++ Will also work on GT-370/371 up to serial number 53473 +++ As well as 1985 to 1991 Yamaha gas G2 only.

Part Number: SO55-000

SO11-052 - 36 Volt Solenoid

36 Volt, 4 Terminal, Heavy Duty Solenoid with silver contacts for 1987 and newer Columbia Par Car +++ 1989 and newer E-Z-GO electric +++ 1988 and newer Club Car electric industrial vehicles +++ 1990 and newer Yamaha electric models G8, G9, G11, G14, G16 +++ 1990 to 1994 Cushman GT-1 and GT America +9++ 2006 and newer Cushman Titan 36 volt model +++ 1986 and newer Melex with electronic speed control +++ Also Taylor-Dunn model B-150 & others +++ Also 1992 and newer Nordskog models 280 and 282 A, B, C and D +++ Also Jacobsen and Motrec.

Part Number: SO11-052

SO44-090 - 48 Volt Solenoid

48 Volt 4 Terminal Solenoid for 1995 to 1998 Club Car electric and 1996 to 1997 Powerdrive electric carts +++ Also E-Z-GO and Columbia Par Car with 48 Volt systems +++ Also replacement for 1996 to 2014 Yamaha electric.

Part Number: SO44-090

SO11-050 - 36 Volt Solenoid

36 Volt, 4 Terminal, Heavy Duty Replacement Solenoid for 1987 and newer Columbia Par Car +++ 1989 and newer E-Z-GO electric +++ 1988 and newer Club Car electric industrial vehicle +++ 1990 and newer Yamaha electric models G8, G9, G11, G14, G16 +++ 1986 and newer Melex with electronic speed control +++ Taylor-Dunn model B-150 and others +++ Also Jacobsen.

Part Number: SO11-050

SO99-020 - 12 Volt Solenoid

12 volt, 4 Terminal Solenoid with silver contacts for 1985 and newer Yamaha models G2, G8, G9, G11, G14, G16 and G20 with 4 cycle gas +++ Also 90s Cushman GT-1E and UTV MAX electrics.

Part Number: SO99-020

SO99-040 - 12 Volt Solenoid

12 Volt Solenoid for 1997 and newer Yamaha gas models G11,G21,G22, G23, G27, G28 and model YDR "The Drive" +++ 4 Terminals and copper contacts.

Part Number: SO99-040

SO99-050 - 48 Volt Solenoid

48 Volt Original Style Solenoid used on 2003 to 2014 Yamaha electric models G22, G23, G27 and G29 YDR "The Drive" +++ Has 4 Terminals with silver contacts.

Part Number: SO99-050

SO66-060 - 36 Volt Solenoid, 6 Terminal

36 Volt, 6 Terminal Reversing Solenoid for Taylor-Dunn model B-50 Shuttle Master +++ Cushman Tug model XI-340 and model 605248 +++ Replacement Solenoid for 1982 to 1989 Yamaha G1 Electric +++ Can also be used to retrofit the obsolete relay number J14-81951-00-00 on the 1980 to 1981 G1.

Part Number: SO66-060

SO66-050 - Solenoid, 6 Terminal, 12 volt

12 Volt Starter Solenoid for 1994 and newer Melex model 512G +++ Also Taylor Dunn and other carts +++ Will replace White-Rogers 6 terminal 586 series reversing solenoid on 1990s Cushman GT-1 and UTV MAX electric carts +++ Replacement solenoid for 1982 to 1989 Yamaha G1 2 cycle gas reversing solenoid +++ Can also be used to retrofit the obsolete relay number J10-81951-00-00 on the 1979 to 1981 G1.

Part Number: SO66-050

 
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Yamaha g16 shorted at solenoid now not working

Gone Wild

 
Raystar57's Avatar
Club Car
 

Join Date: Feb 2017

Location: Richmond, TX

Posts: 1,026

DefaultRe: Yamaha g16 shorted at solenoid now not working

The diodes could have been damaged.
I would check them both but if #4 is bad the solenoid would not get voltage on the small terminals.
I circled the power port by accident in my last post instead of the key switch.

I hope the controller solenoid dirve circuit is not damaged as controllers don't like sparks and shorts.

Check the diodes next.

Sours: https://buggiesgonewild.com/showthread.php?t=135583
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You’ve studied up on the latest golf cart models, make sure that you operate your cart safely, and follow basic maintenance rules.

However, lately, your golf cart has been having trouble starting. You suspect that you may have a bad solenoid on your hands.

But what are the most common solenoid problems? And what are the biggest symptoms of a bad solenoid on golf cart?

Keep on reading this post when you’re ready to find out. We’ll also let you know where you can go to find the quality replacement parts you need for your cart.

What is a Solenoid?

Before we get into the signs of a bad solenoid on a golf cart, let’s make sure you know what one is.

A solenoid is integral to your golf cart’s functionality, as it’s the main switch that directs the battery’s current to your generator, traction motor, or starter. However, because it has so much responsibility, it can break down somewhat often. If you have a battery-powered golf cart, it may break down even more frequently.

Remember that your golf cart’s solenoid is in use whenever your foot is down on the pedal–and it stops and starts right along with your golf cart. This can lead to solenoid problems, especially if you take your cart out often.

Since a single round of golf can take anywhere from two to four hours on average, the solenoid works overtime all the time.

The Symptoms of Symptoms of a Bad Solenoid on Golf Cart

Now, let’s check out the most common signs of problems with the solenoid in your golf cart.

Remember that you don’t need to experience all of these issues for there to be a problem–though you may deal with more than one of them at work.

If you ignore any of these problems, remember that things will only get worse. In addition to having to get a new solenoid, you may also have to get a completely new starter.

If You Have a Gas Golf Cart

If you’re driving a gas golf cart, your main issue will likely be your large contacts’ failure to release. If this happens, your starter is working even though the ignition is turned off.

You may also have trouble with your spring being too worn down to properly pull the pinion back to the neutral position. This means that your starter isn’t able to disengage and that it’s working all the time.

In some cases, you might even start to hear lots of small, continuous clicks when you try to turn on your cart. However, in spite of these clicks, your cart isn’t going anywhere. This means that your starter isn’t working at all.

If You Have an Electric Golf Cart

If you’re driving an electric golf cart, you may deal with fewer symptoms of a bad solenoid on golf cart. However, that doesn’t mean that you won’t ever run into any problems.

The main sign of an issue in an electric cart is a lack of any “click” noise at all when you turn on your cart’s ignition. Usually, you’ll be able to hear the solenoid clicking both on and off whenever you switch your ignition.

But if you don’t hear anything?

It’s likely that the solenoid can no longer send electricity out to power the golf cart.

In some cases, this happens because the coil of the battery is worn out or is too old. It can also be a sign of a faulty battery or even loose connections within the solenoid.

Additionally, you could be dealing with overheated contacts. This is an issue you need to take seriously. Not only is it dangerous, but it can also wreak havoc on your starter as a whole.

How to Test for a Bad Solenoid

Of course, part of golf cart troubleshooting is also knowing how to test your solenoid for issues.

First, grab a voltmeter and a wrench (a 1/2 inch wrench is your best bet.) Then, make sure you’ve unplugged any cables from your two big terminals, wrapping up the ends with tape to be on the safe side. Ensure that your golf cart is completely off and that the cart is in neutral.

Set your voltmeter to the ohms reading, and connect its probe to each one of the big terminals. Of course, the reading should be zero.

Next, move the cart’s switch to forward, turn it on, and accelerate slowly. Your solenoid should click. Use the voltmeter to take another reading. If it’s between 0 to 0.4 ohms, your solenoid is still in good shape. If it’s above that, it’s time for a replacement.

Finally, remember to buy a solenoid that’s compatible with the voltage in your golf cart. Usually, that means you’ll need a 36-volt option or a 48-volt option. Check your old solenoid if you’re unsure–the voltage is on the side.

Need More Golf Cart Troubleshooting Tips?

We hope that this post has helped you to better recognize the symptoms of a bad solenoid on golf cart.

Remember to replace your solenoid as soon as possible to prevent this issue from getting any worse.

Looking for more advice about how to buy and maintain the perfect golf cart for your needs?

We can help you with that. From the latest golf cart reviews, news about new models, and more, we provide all the tips you need. We also sell a wide variety of golf carts and accessories.


This entry was posted in Golf Carts.

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1996 Yamaha G16, 36 Volt Electric - Replace Bad Solenoid

Yamaha Solenoids

Golf Car Catalog offers a great selection of solenoids for Yamaha G1, G2, G3, G5, G8, G9, G14, G16, G19, G22, GMAX, G29, and Drive model golf carts, utility vehicles, and personnel carriers. We carry solenoids for both gas and electric golf carts at the 12V, 24V, 36V, and 48V voltage level as well as amperages from 100A up to 1200A. Solenoids are also often referred to as contactors, or relays.

A solenoid is an electro-magnetic switch. This means when 12, 36 or 48-volts is applied to the small terminals on the solenoid an internal steel plunger with a large flat metal washer on one end is magnetically forced (thrown) against the two large copper terminals, thus allowing them to conduct electricity through the solenoid. A solenoid makes or breaks the circuit carrying the large amount of current required to crank a gas car or power an electric car. This high current switching would cause standard switches to fail. As it is the solenoid is the most common failure in electric cars, especially older ones.

The solenoids common to gas and electric golf cars come in two similar but different varieties; a 4 terminal, with two small 'control circuit' terminals & two large copper 'power circuit' terminals, and a 6 terminal, or double throw solenoid, which has two small terminals & four large copper terminals. Even though a solenoid is a switch it needs another switch to make it throw, or start to conduct electricity through the large copper terminals. That 'other' switch is usually an accelerator switch connected to the gas pedal. When you press on the pedal the acc switch closes and this allows power to activate the solenoid. The large washer on the end of the internal plunger throws hard against the large copper terminals and power begins to flow.

Sours: https://www.golfcarcatalog.com/parts/solenoids/yamaha-solenoids.html

Solenoid yamaha g16

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2003 Yamaha G22, 48 Volt Electric - Not Moving, Replace Solenoid

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