Easybcd uefi

Easybcd uefi DEFAULT

Adding Linux to GRUB boot menu in UEFI mode to dual boot with Windows 10

There are several possible things that might be going wrong.

1.) The Kali installer may have installed a traditional BIOS/MBR-style version of GRUB instead of an UEFI version. If your firmware prefers UEFI-style boot over legacy BIOS style, this bootloader will be completely ineffective, as the firmware just won't load the old-style Master Boot Record at all, once it sees that the Windows UEFI bootloader is in place.

2.) The Kali installer may have installed an UEFI version of GRUB, but without the that is necessary for Secure Boot - and the Secure Boot implementation of your system's UEFI firmware may silently bypass any bootloader that does not have the necessary Secure Boot signatures, if Secure Boot is enabled.

(Other UEFI implementations will output a scary security error message if Secure Boot is enabled and they encounter a bootloader with a missing or invalid Secure Boot signature. That at least would make this case easier to troubleshoot.)

3.) The Kali installer may have successfully installed a Secure Boot-capable UEFI bootloader, but failed to register it in the firmware NVRAM. Or maybe the firmware implementation will only accept the boot filename of a standard Windows bootloader - that would qualify as a firmware bug.


The first step for identifying between these cases would be letting the system boot to Windows 10, running a Command Prompt as an Administrator, and using the command. This will list the boot options registered in NVRAM and the BootOrder settings. If there is no mention of Kali in the output, you can tentatively exclude problem #2 for now - you definitely have at least problem #1 or #3.

If problem #2 seems likely, it can be worked around by disabling Secure Boot, or by clearing the Secure Boot Primary Key (PK) variable. Often (but maybe not always) the UEFI BIOS Setup offers a way to do one or both of these things.

The next step would require booting Kali (or some other Linux) from live USB and using it to gain access to the Kali installation on the HDD. After mounting the Linux partition(s) on the HDD, go to the directory and list the contents of that directory. If there is a sub-directory named , you have an UEFI version of GRUB installed and can definitely exclude problem #1.

If, on the other hand, there is a sub-directory named , you have a traditional BIOS/MBR version of GRUB installed, confirming problem #1. Fixing it would require chrooting to the HDD-based installation and using the package management tools to replace the and packages with and respectively. (If you cannot disable Secure Boot, get the -signed version of the first package if available, and also the package.)

If it turns out you have problem #3, you can fix it by using the command in your Kali Live USB - but only if that Live USB is bootable in the UEFI native style. If the Live USB is booting in the legacy BIOS/MBR style, the legacy compatibility firmware code will hide away the interface that is needed by the command.

Alternative tools for fixing problem #3 in the Windows side:

  • there used to be a program named from the same manufacturer as . Even the completely free version of that program would have been sufficient. Unfortunately, only a trial version of it is now available for free.
  • there seems to be a program called from a Chinese developer that apparently could do the job. I haven't tested it.
  • I think Windows 10's native command might be able to register a new UEFI bootloader, but the procedure seems a bit awkward and I haven't tested this.
  • You can use as an administrator to gain access to the EFI System Partition in Windows. Once done, hide the ESP again with .

answered Aug 27 '18 at 14:56

telcoMtelcoM

59.1k11 gold badge7575 silver badges151151 bronze badges

Sours: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/336038/adding-linux-to-grub-boot-menu-in-uefi-mode-to-dual-boot-with-windows-10

EasyBCD and UEFI

With the release of Windows 8 and Windows 10, many new computers are shipping with something known as the UEFI firmware and boot manager in place of the traditional BIOS and MBR approach to starting up your PC. The changes are not small and have had a massive effect on the process of dual-booting on a Windows machine.

Newer computers are shipping with a BIOS replacement called UEFI – short for Unified Extensible Firmware Interface – that completely changes the way operating systems interact with and are loaded from the hardware in your PC. It is not fundamentally incompatible with dual-booting, but the way that Microsoft and PC manufacturers have implemented UEFI, it makes it a lot harder to do so.

Upon starting EasyBCD on a machine that is currently booting in UEFI mode, the following dialog will be seen:

EFI Warning

EFI Bootloader Detected!

EasyBCD has detected that your machine is currently booting in EFI mode. Due to limitations set by Microsoft, many of EasyBCD’s multi-booting features cannot be used in EFI mode and have been disabled.

Press ‘OK’ to continue or ‘Help’ to read more about these limitations and possible workarounds.

Contents

What this means

If your Windows PC is booting in EFI mode, Microsoft has blocked the loading of legacy or non-Windows operating systems from the BCD menu. This means that you can no longer use EasyBCD to add Windows 9x, XP, or Server 2003 entries to the BCD bootloader menu. You also cannot add DOS, Linux, BSD, or Mac entries. You can add multiple Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10 entries; and you can also boot into BCD-based portable media, such as WinPE 2.0+ images.

EasyBCD is 100% UEFI-ready. In UEFI mode, much of EasyBCD’s functionality will be disabled for the safety of your PC. It abides by the restrictions Microsoft has placed on the bootloader that will block any attempts to load non-Microsoft-signed kernels (including chainloaders) from the top-level BCD menu, and it will create 100%-compliant UEFI entries other installed Windows operating systems on your PC. These limitations are not short comings of EasyBCD nor can they be lightly bypassed, they have been put in place by Microsoft.

Option 1: Disable UEFI and Secure Boot

Most PCs and laptops currently shipping with and using the UEFI firmware and bootloader can be configured to disable UEFI entirely and instead revert to “legacy” MBR boot mode. Two separate steps are often required to fully achieve this; we have documented both with visual guides and sample images taken from the more-common UEFI configuration pages:

  1. Enabling legacy boot mode on UEFI PCs
  2. Disabling Secure Boot

These steps do not turn off UEFI (which isn’t possible, since that’s what your motherboard is running), but they do enable you to boot into Windows the traditional way (via the MBR). However, your Windows installation is already in UEFI/GPT mode, and UEFI installations of Windows cannot be booted via the legacy MBR approach! You will need to either format (making sure to completely reinitialize the disk to get rid of the GPT) and reinstall Windows, or else use a utility like Easy Recovery Essentials which can convert your existing installation to be bootable in both UEFI/GPT and BIOS/MBR mode in-place, without losing any data. Performing a single “Automated Repair” run in EasyRE is sufficient to make your Windows installation bootable in legacy/MBR mode as well as EFI/GPT mode. You may need to give legacy/bios mode loading priority over UEFI in your BIOS setup/configuration (“load legacy first”).

Option 2: Use a virtual machine

With improvements to virtualization technologies in recent years, it’s no longer hard or painful to run another operating system (or several, for that matter) in a virtual machine instead of dual-booting natively. Using any of the popular, free virtualization software like Windows Virtual PC, VirtualBox, or VMware Server it is possible to install Linux, older versions of Windows, DOS, and other operating systems in a so-called “virtual machine” which looks and acts like another PC but runs in a window on your desktop – no rebooting required – letting you run both operating systems at once. This approach is fully compatible (and independent from) the MBR/UEFI issue, and should work fine on most modern machines. On older machines or machines with restricted amounts of RAM (under 4 or 8 GiB) available, this can be a taxing workload for your PC, however.

Option 3: Use GRUB2 EFI as your main boot manager

EasyBCD controls the Windows boot menu, and has traditionally been used as the primary boot manager. With EasyBCD, it is possible to add entries for Linux and older versions of Windows to the top-level BCD menu seen when your machine first boots. Since the Windows boot manager running in UEFI mode does not support the loading of legacy and non-Microsoft operating systems, another option is possible.

When installing Linux or any other 3rd party OS that ships with its own bootloader, instead of choosing to install GRUB to the bootsector as is traditionally done when opting to use EasyBCD to control your boot menu, choose to install GRUB to the MBR (or disk, in this case) and make it the main bootloader for your PC. You can add the Windows boot menu to the GRUB2 EFI boot menu – in this case, you’ll see GRUB’s boot menu when your PC starts, and from there you can choose Windows. You can still use EasyBCD to control the Windows boot menu and set up multi-boots and re-configure Vista+ entries in the BCD boot menu, but with the GRUB2 EFI menu loading first, you can use that to boot into Linux and to chainload NTLDR to boot into Windows 9x.

Sours: https://neosmart.net/wiki/easybcd/uefi/
  1. Is nj unemployment open today
  2. 150cc chinese scooter battery
  3. Range rover keychain
  4. The rockstar update service is unavailable
  5. Tufted seat cushion

I know this question has been asked a lot, but I didn't find an answer here.

Ubuntu 12.04.2 64-bit was installed offline just a few hours ago on one ext4 partition, and a swap partition was also created.

The installation went fine, but now I can't get into Ubuntu.

I want to use the Windows 8 boot manager, to select between the two operating systems, so I downloaded EasyBCD and added an entry for Ubuntu.

The entry shows up in the boot manager menu, but when I click on Ubuntu I get the following message:

I tried enabling/disabling Secure Boot and restarting, but it still shows that error message.

Boot repair summaryLatest boot repair summary

Out of desperation I tried to find a solution myself and reset the BCD configuration via EasyBCD. Now Grub boots fine and Ubuntu too, but I can't boot Windows 8 anymore.

Then, for whatever reason after installing all updates for Ubuntu, I restarted the system and now I can't boot into Ubuntu. Only via Live CD and the old Linux entry can I start it.

Sours: https://itectec.com/ubuntu/ubuntu-how-to-use-easybcd-as-bootloader-with-windows-8-and-uefi/
How to Dual Boot Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Windows 10 [ 2020 ] - UEFI - GPT Method

How do I use EasyBCD as bootloader with Windows 8 and UEFI?

I know this question has been asked a lot, but I didn't find an answer here.

Ubuntu 12.04.2 64-bit was installed offline just a few hours ago on one ext4 partition, and a swap partition was also created.

The installation went fine, but now I can't get into Ubuntu.

I want to use the Windows 8 boot manager, to select between the two operating systems, so I downloaded EasyBCD and added an entry for Ubuntu.

The entry shows up in the boot manager menu, but when I click on Ubuntu I get the following message:

I tried enabling/disabling Secure Boot and restarting, but it still shows that error message.

Boot repair summaryLatest boot repair summary

Out of desperation I tried to find a solution myself and reset the BCD configuration via EasyBCD. Now Grub boots fine and Ubuntu too, but I can't boot Windows 8 anymore.

Then, for whatever reason after installing all updates for Ubuntu, I restarted the system and now I can't boot into Ubuntu. Only via Live CD and the old Linux entry can I start it.

Sours: https://askubuntu.com/questions/334186/how-do-i-use-easybcd-as-bootloader-with-windows-8-and-uefi

Uefi easybcd

EasyBCD extends and revamps the Windows BCD bootloader. Setting up and configuring a dual-boot between Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, older versions of Windows such as XP & 2003, Linux, Ubuntu, BSD, and macOS is a breeze. You just point and click and EasyBCD does the rest.

EasyBCD is geared for users of all kinds. Whether you just want to add an entry to your old XP partition or want to create a duplicate for testing purposes; if you're interested in debugging the Windows Kernel or septuple-booting your seven test operating systems, EasyBCD is the key.

  • Boot anything. Windows, Linux, Mac, & BSD. Boot both from and into USB drives, ISO images, virtual disks, and more.
  • Boot anywhere. Create bootable USB sticks with repair utilities that you can take with you anywhere.
  • Protect against disaster. Create entries to boot into recovery utilities or safe mode to prepare for a rainy day.
  • Painless editing. Add, rename, remove, configure, and reorder entries at whim.
  • Solve difficult problems. Use EasyBCD to troubleshoot Windows, back up and repair the bootloader, and more.
  • Powerful scripting with NeoGrub. You'll have the power to hide partitions, change active flags, and create complex boot scenarios.

What's New:

  • [EBCD-562] - Fixed: bcdboot paramters in RepairBootDrive call
  • [EBCD-566] - Fixed:/NLT crashes on malformed XML translation files
  • [EBCD-578] - Fixed: partitions with 64-bit extensions are not supported
  • [EBCD-564] - Fixed: Detect <= Windows 7 and disable metro bootloader to prevent hidden boot menu
  • [EBCD-572] - Fixed: Statusbar height shrinks when blank under Windows 10
  • [EBCD-568] - New: Add autocompletion to all path textboxes
  • [EBCD-571] - New: Add Ability to turn on/off hypervisor state for entries
  • [EBCD-565] - New: Verify destination of "change boot partition" is at least 75 MiB
  • [EBCD-561] - Include Bulgarian in BCD/BOOTMGR locale list
  • [EBCD-567] - Include XML validity checks as part of build process
  • [EBCD-573] - Custom SWF high-DPI support in EasyBCD
  • [EBCD-574] - High-DPI support in EasyBCD setup
  • [EBCD-564] - Do not repeatedly apply existing settings when modifying entry attribute

Read more

Software similar to EasyBCD 7

  • 4.6

    2600 votes

    Rufus 3.16

    One of the best tools to create bootable USB drives, the easy way. Works for Windows, Linux, DOS, UEFI and ARM.

  • 4.6

    443 votes

    YUMI 2.0.9.1

    YUMI lets you create a Multiboot USB Flash Drive containing multiple OS, antivirus utilities, disc cloning, diagnostic tools, and more.

  • 4.4

    220 votes

    VirtualBox 6.1.26

    VirtualBox is a general-purpose full virtualizer for x86 hardware. Targeted at server, desktop and embedded use, it is now the only professional-quality virtualization solution that is also Open Source Software.

    • Freeware
    • Windows/macOS/Linux
  • 4.4

    107 votes

    Microsoft Windows ISO Download Tool 8.46

    This new tool allows an easy and comfortable way to download genuine Windows 7, 8.1 and 10, as well as Office 2007, 2010 and 2011 disk images (ISO) directly from Microsoft's servers.

  • More similar downloads

Popular apps in Operating Systems

Sours: https://www.techspot.com/downloads/3112-easybcd.html
How to Convert UEFI to Legacy of Installed Windows 10/8.1/7 (Complete Tutorial)

  1. Grub Customizer is a graphical interface to configure the GRUB2/BURG settings and menuentries.
    Grub Customizer vs EasyBCD opinions
  2. Bootice - utility to modify or backup/restore your MBR (Master Boot Record) or PBR (Partition Boot Record).

    Discontinued

    Author's website no longer exists, software can still be downloaded from third party sites.



  3. rEFInd is a fork of the rEFIt boot manager for computers based on the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) and Unified EFI (UEFI).
  4. Safely dual boot Windows and Linux without touching the Windows MBR. Grub2Win installs to Windows 8, Windows 7, XP, 2000 or Vista. It boots native, open source GNU grub version 2.00 code. Everything is contained in one 7 MB directory on your Windows C: drive.
    Grub2Win vs EasyBCD opinions
  5. Visual BCD Editor - advanced GUI version of bcdedit utility. Automatic boot loader creation - Windows 7|Vista|XP|VHD. Fix boot manager and dual boot problems.


  6. EFI/UEFI boot option management EasyUEFI owns comprehensive EFI/UEFI boot option management functions, such as create, delete, edit, clean up, backup and restore EFI/UEFI boot options, specifies an one-time boot entry for the next restart, or change EFI/UEFI boot order, all...
  7. VBoot allows you to boot a physical computer from a single virtual disk file in VHD/VMDK/VDI/Raw format. Each file contains a single operating system. It supports Windows 2000, Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7, 2003 Server, 2008 Server and Linux 2.6, 32- and 64-bit.
  8. rEFIt is a boot menu and maintenance toolkit for EFI-based machines like the Intel Macs. You can use it to boot multiple operating systems easily, including triple-boot setups with Boot Camp. It also provides an easy way to enter and explore the EFI pre-boot environment.

    Discontinued

    rEFIt is no longer maintained since 2013. The author suggested to check out rEFInd - Boot Manager , a fork of the original program.

  9. The development of LILO as classic bootloader for GNU/Linux systems was restarted in June 2010. Because of the simpleness LILO has some advantages comparing with Grub and Grub2. But nowadays LILO is not the bootloader for all situations. But LILO is longtime proved and stable.
  10. BootIt Bare Metal is a boot manager and partition manager software utility. Whither you want to do non-destructive repartitioning or boot multiple operating systems, this is the product for you.

Showing 10 of 20 alternatives

Sours: https://alternativeto.net/software/easybcd/

You will also like:

.



687 688 689 690 691