Klr fuel injection

Klr fuel injection DEFAULT
Kawasaki breathe life back into their dual-sport legend KLR with an all-new, “adventure hungry” model featuring a fuel-injection engine, a new range of travel accessories and special editions including a camo grey colour edition.

Kawasaki are clearly aiming far and wide with the reincarnation of the KLR Their new model for throws a net across adventure bike market naturally enough but also aims at commuters as much as the old following of riders taking the KLR to the trails.

The common thread across all those potential customers is a relatively cheap to own and run, single cylinder which is expected to live up to that indestructible and go-anywhere family history.

The KLRs boast plenty including a new fuel-injected cc single-cylinder engine which they say is more reliable and fuel-efficient plus there are a heap of new parts and features that frankly make it seem like twice the bike it always has been.

KLR highlights:

  • Fuel-injected cc, single-cylinder engine
  • Multi-Functional Digital Instrumentation with fuel gauge
  • LED Headlight
  • All-new bodywork and fuel tank
  • Larger front brake disc and optional ABS
  • Increased carrying capacity an accessory range

Focus on the new engine

The KLR is powered by one of the most well-known, reliable, and trusted engines in the motorcycle industry say Kawasaki and, in the dual-sport market at least, it is hard to argue with that fact.

The liquid-cooled, four-stroke, cc single-cylinder engine features a DOHC cylinder head and produces a flat power curve that is typical of the breed. The model is equipped with fuel injection which combines with the US Gal (23 litre) fuel tank, for an increased riding range between fuel stops they say – although the capacity does not actually increase, the fuel pump sits lower and therefore suck gas for longer. 

22klh_gy2fega3cg_a_med

Featuring fuel injection for the first time, the new KLR remains an easy bike to get on and ride with an electric start which, especially at high altitude or in cold conditions, makes it a reliable work horse. Kawasaki say the hole, fine-atomizing fuel injector sprays 60 µm droplets, which increase air-fuel combustion efficiency. Revised intake and exhaust cam profiles improve mid-range power and torque characteristics. A stronger cam chain guide material and shape add to the increased reliability.

They also say the exhaust pipe diameter has been reduced by mm to improve mid-range torque characteristics to better suit everyday riding. An oxygen sensor provides feedback to the fuel injection system, contributing to cleaner exhaust emissions and increased fuel efficiency.

Several updates have been made to improve gear-shifting feel and reduce weight also including the clutch release bearings which have been changed from ball to thrust-needle bearings, the gear dogs in the transmission and shift fork have also been revised on third gear, and a new finishing treatment is now used for fourth and fifth gears.

A new sealed battery adds to the convenience and is significantly lighter than the previous battery Kawasaki say. The starter, ignition coil, and evaporator canister have all been revised and are now lighter than on previous models.

KLR engine highlights:

  • New fuel injection
  • Revised cam profiles
  • New exhaust pipe diameter
  • Updated clutch
  • Increased ACG Output
  • Low maintenance battery
  • Lighter starter, ignition coil and evaporator canister
  • New honeycomb catalyser

Chassis upgrades

Kawasaki have stuck fast with the KLR’s proven semi-double-cradle frame but say it receives updates on the new model including a new rear frame integrated with the main frame to increase torsional rigidity. A 30mm longer swingarm with a 2mm larger diameter swingarm pivot shaft also contributes to better handling.

New chassis highlights:

  • New rear subframe
  • New swingarm
  • Larger swingarm pivot shaft
  • Front and rear suspension settings
  • Larger front brake disc
  • Thicker rear brake disc
  • Optional ABS models
  • Stronger rear wheel rim
  • Larger-diameter axle

 

Uni-Trak system still going strong

Both front and rear suspension settings have been improved toe suit the new bike weight and “complement the new frame to help provide a more planted feel” Kawasaki say. As you’d expect and hope with a dual-sport bike the set-up is designed for both on and off-road riding. 41mm front forks with mm of suspension travel and firmer fork springs to improve “bump compliance and bottoming resistance” while also reducing front-end dive under heavy braking they say.

22klh_gy2nrs3cg_a_med

The very much tried and tested adjustable Uni-Trak system at the back has mm of travel which complements the front fork settings with a progressive rear suspension action while contributing to a low center of gravity, Kawasaki say. Again, it is firmer than previous models to help resist bottoming and accommodate any heavier loads not least from the additional luggage carrying capacity.

Rear spring preload and rebound damping are adjustable to allow riders to fine-tune suspension settings to suit the riding conditions and preference.

Larger, mm front brake disc

More power weight = bigger brakes as the new KLR gets a larger mm front brake disc for greater braking power. The disc shape has been changed from a petal-type disc to a round disc or rotor also. The rear brake disc is slightly thicker to improve heat dissipation when under heavy braking and is also now round.

Kawasaki are offering models with and without ABS which will be a bonus as clearly not everyone wants or needs the anti-locking system off-road, but many prefer the security on road.

The KLR comes equipped with a 21” front wheel and 17” rear wheel which also has a stronger rim. The front and rear tyres are tube types by the way, making it possible for roadside repairs. Both front and rear wheel axles are of a larger diameter also.

Ergonomic highlights:

  • New handlebar and footpeg positions, both with rubber mounts
  • New fuel tank design with more “usable” volume
  • Taller windshield
  • New seat design improved comfort 
  • New pillion grab bars
  • 30mm shorter side stand
  • New bodywork
  • LED headlight, plus new taillight and indicators
  • All-new digital instrument panel
  • Longer mirror arms

Refreshing the old comforts

The KLR and its old-school, trail bike ilk are known for their upright riding position but Kawasaki say they have adjusted it for “to deliver a stress-free position for a longer adventure”. 

One difference is the anti-vibration rubber mounts on the handlebars and inserts in the footpegs which have also been moved 10mm outwards to provide adjustability and put the rider in a slightly more relaxed position.

22klh_gy2fft3cg_a_med

A new fuel tank design on the new chassis brings a more “natural fit with the rider’s knees for comfort and increased controllability” Kawasaki says. While the volume of the new fuel tank remains the same, the useable volume has been increased through redesign and a new fuel pump that draws from the very bottom of the tank, contributing to a longer riding range.  

A new windshield is 50mm taller than the previous model and features two-position adjustability giving you a further 30mm. The seat shape has been revised and the new urethane cover is both thicker and firmer to improve rider comfort – rubber dampers have also been added under the seat to aid comfort.

Passenger grab bars have been reshaped, improving passenger comfort. The side stand has been shortened 30mm, making it easier to deploy when on the bike. 

Adventure ready

The KLR’s robust legend as a go-anywhere bike, one of the original adventure bike sof old if you like, has been built upon further for this new model. New colours and textured graphics are the new face “to emphasize its ruggedness”. New styling includes a protector-equipped shroud design, a new side cover design and tail cowl to create a “robust styling package”. The taller windshield adds to that new adventure bike look the Kawasaki engineers say they set out to achieve on the KLR

A new bright LED headlight will shine brighter if you’re riding past those sunsets while the new taillight and turn signal design add to the new look. Longer mirror arms help the rearwards view also.

An all-digital instrument panel offers information at-a-glance through a large display and easy-to-read LCD screen with white backlighting. The instrument panel features a speedometer, odometer, dual trip meters, fuel gauge, clock, and indicator lamps. The narrowed-down display however prioritizes visibility of the speedometer and fuel gauge.

Going big on the accessories

Kawasaki Genuine Accessories (KGA) give riders chance to personalize the looks of their KLR and improve the potential for travel with side and top cases. The side cases feature a top-opening design that makes it easy to add and remove items when they are mounted on the bike. They also easily clip onto their mounting brackets for a secure fit, Kawasaki says.

The top case is large enough to accommodate an off-road style helmet and both side and and the top cases can be fitted with a one-key system. There’s also a larger aluminum rear carrier, a grip heater set, LED auxiliary light set, engine guards, DC power outlet, and USB socket options.

Special Editions

Also new on the KLR are two model variations that arrive ready fitted with the factory-equipped accessories and both come standard with ABS. The KLR ADVENTURE model comes equipped with factory-installed side cases, LED auxiliary light set, engine guards, tank pad, and both DC power outlet and USB socket and is available in the Cypher Camo Gray colourway.

This model is designed for the adventurer who is looking for increased carry capacity and convenience.  The KLR  TRAVELER model features a factory-installed top case and both DC power outlet and USB socket and comes in Pearl Lava Orange colourway.

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Bright, new colours

The range colours for the KLR are: Pearl Sand Khaki and Pearl Lava Orange for standard models. The KLR ABS is available in Pearl Sand Khaki. The KLR ADVENTURE model is available in Cypher Camo Gray and the KLR TRAVELER model is available in Pearl Lava Orange.

 

MSRP

KLR - $6,

KLR ABS - $6,

KLR TRAVELER - $7,

KLR ADVENTURE - $7,

(US price. Prices in other countries are not yet released. In fact availabilty in other countries, except in Australia, is not yet clear.)

 

More information: www.kawasaki.com

 

Sours: https://endurocom/en/bikes/latest/first-look-kawasaki-update-legendary-klr

After a little over two months of speculation about what bikes Kawasaki was going to unveil on January 26, , we finally found out what was hiding under the covers.  

Alongside the short version of the KLXR S motocrosser, Kawasaki unveiled the long-awaited and highly-anticipated new KLR The returning iconic dual-sport is both new and old, modernized and true to its roots. We take a look at everything that’s new and everything that isn’t on the new Kawasaki KLR  

Same, But New 

We knew Kawasaki would eventually re-enter the adventure slash dual-sport segment, we just didn’t know when or how. We had a lot of thoughts about how Team Green would make its comeback, but frankly, we didn’t expect the KLR to return almost identical as the previous model. 

Instead of trying to re-invent the wheel, the company stuck with a formula that works. Under the modernized bodywork, the popular dual-sport continues to rock a cc single-cylinder mill rate at 39 lb-ft of torque (no horsepower figure announced) and paired with a five-speed gearbox.  

The suspension set up is also the same (41mm telescopic fork and Uni-Trak monoshock with and inches of travel respectively), however, the brakes hardware changed slightly with a larger disc at the front (mm over ) and a thicker disc at the back.  

As for the ergos, they were also tweaked ever so slightly to improve riding comfort. The tweaks include a wider handlebar (+10mm), foot pegs pushed forward (+10mm), rubber mounts to limit vibration, an optimized fuel tank shape for increased legroom, and a taller windscreen.  

Fuel-Injection Magic 

Though the list of upgrades on the new KLR is rather short, some of these upgrades are significant. Replacing the Keihin carburetor with a 40mm throttle body is one of them.  

Fuel injection is an important upgrade, especially on a bike designed to go anywhere, anytime. Unlike a carb, fuel injection isn’t sensitive to temperature changes or reduced atmospheric pressure. You don’t need to “warm up the engine” when the mercury drops, nor do you have to worry about getting the engine running at higher altitude. The days of the choke lever are over.  

On top of this, fuel injection is also far more efficient, reliable, and allows the engine to make better use of the fuel available. The bike ultimately runs better and can take those gallons of fuel a lot further than its predecessor.  

Road-side fixes might get trickier if the system does end up failing but that’s the cost of innovation.   

ABS but for Off-Roading 

ABS is a bit of a polarizing system. While it can be tremendously useful on the road when you least expect to lose control of the rear wheel, it does get in the way when that’s exactly what you need the bike to do.  

For that reason, the new KLR remains available without the ABS, but new on the model-year is the addition of an available dual-purpose ABS, developed in collaboration with Bosch. While the system isn’t adjustable (like with riding modes), it is designed to be far less invasive and to slightly delay the reaction time to allow some wheel slippage.  

Kawasaki first introduced the system on the KLX so it kind of made sense for the KLR to receive it as well since it’s designed to be versatile on and off the road.  

Most Affordable Mid-Size Dual-Sport On The Market 

Despite the slew of upgrades it received, there’s yet another thing that hasn’t changed on the KLR: its price. Modernization did not come at a cost this time around as the KLR is offered at $6, which is the same number that appeared on the price tag.  
This makes it the most affordable mid-size dual-sport bike currently on the market.

Comparatively, the Suzuki DRS goes for $6, while the Honda XRL starts at $6, Both competitors continue to run on a carbureted cc single, but on the flip side, they’re also much lighter at and pounds respectively. The pound KLR is a middle-ground bike that’s more travel friendly than its Suzuki and Honda counterparts. 

Four Versions to Meet All Needs 

Kawasaki KLR , Traveler

Also new with the model is the introduction of four trim-levels—two of which are the ABS and non-ABS versions. Kawasaki offers buyers to add a few creature comforts with the Traveler, equipped with a top case, a USB port, and a power outlet to charge all your devices.  

Sitting at the top of the range is the gnarly-looking KLR Adventure, armed with a crash bar and engine guard, auxiliary fog lamps, panniers, and power sockets (USB and DC).  

Pricing for the range goes as follows:  

  • Kawasaki KLR $6,  
  • Kawasaki KLR ABS: $6,  
  • Kawasaki KLR Traveler: $7,  
  • Kawasaki KLR Adventure: $7, 
Sours: https://www.rideapart.com/motorcycle-lists/5-thingskawasak-klroverview/
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FUEL INJECTED KLR FINALLY REVEALED | MANUFACTURER NEWS

27 January / Text Size (-)(+) / Print

Kawasaki releases details of its new fuel injected and ABS-equipped KLR and KLR Adventure

Since the first version was released in , the Kawasaki KLR has been known as the one bike to do everything. This touring-hungry dual-purpose machine will eagerly travel long distances, while offering the versatility to accommodate off-road excursions as well as the daily commute. The KLR offers a riding position for terrific all-day-comfort, plenty of carrying capacity, an incredibly efficient engine and a large fuel tank for extended time between fill ups. It is as happy on a minute run to the grocery store as it is on a day cross-country tour. With a inch front wheel and plenty of suspension travel, the KLR lets you take on the challenges of back roads across the country – and the world – in complete confidence. For the KLR, a change to fuel injection offers increased reliability and fuel efficiency. A new fuel tank design that minimises residual fuel volume, numerous strengthened parts and increased riding confidence when carrying luggage, reduced vibrations and increased generator capacity contribute to improved reliability and ride comfort – exactly what you need in a tough adventure partner.

Two versions will be available in Australia, the KLR and KLR Adventure. Both come standard with ABS, with the Adventure gaining lockable panniers, fog lamps, frame sliders, DC and USB socket.

The KLR tips the scales at a claimed kg, 16kg heavier than the outgoing model, with the KLR Adventure weighing in at kg.

Availability of the two new KLRs is slated for the second half of with pricing yet to be announced.

KAWASAKI TEAM GREEN FRESH FEATURES:

Reliable cm3 four-valve, single cylinder engine produces a flat power curve to navigate trails and cruise highways.

Addition of fuel injection, combined with a 23L tank’s efficient use, makes for a long range between fill-ups.

Tough Semi-double cradle frame now has rear frame integrated with the main frame and swingarm extended by 30mm.

Changes to front and rear suspension settings have been made to match the frame setup.

Large mm front and mm rear brakes deliver strong braking power & good heat dissipation under braking.

Fine-tuned handlebar and foot-peg position (10mm outwards) put the rider in a more relaxed riding position and rubber mounts to reduce vibration.

All-digital Instrument panel offers at-a-glance information care of a large, easy to read LCD screen.

Genuine Accessories include grip heaters, fog lamps, low seat, Top Box, Panniers, Frame Sliders, DC and USB socket.

Engine Type

Liquid Cooled, 4-Stroke Single

Dimensions

KLF &#; 2, x x 1, mm

KLH &#; 2, x x 1, mm (Adventure)

Displacement

cm3

Fuel Capacity

23 litres

Power

kW (39PS) / 6,min

Front Brakes

Single mm Disc, dual-piston

Torque

N.m (kgfm) / 4,min

Rear Brakes

Single mm Disc, dual piston

Curb Mass

KLF &#; kg

KLH kg (Adventure)

Front Tyre

90/M/C 54S

Seat Height

mm

Rear Tyre

/M/C 65S

Sours: https://amcn.com.au/editorial/fuel-injected-klrfinally-revealed/
Modern electronic fuel injection system

After much speculation and rumors, Kawasaki has announced today the return of the faithful KLR to its lineup. The legendary dual-sport bike is back with key improvements, including new technology many riders have been waiting for. 

At the heart of the KLR is its long-running cc single-cylinder engine, now equipped for the first time with fuel injection. Kawasaki states the changes not only make starting easier, but this update combined with the fuel tank’s greater usable volume contributes to an increased range between fuel stops. Performance has also been improved with revised intake and exhaust cam profiles resulting in increased power and torque in the mid range. Plus a stronger cam chain guide material and shape add to the increased reliability. The new model still retains a 5-speed gearbox, but several refinements have been made for smoother shifting operation.

Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR

A new multi-functional LCD digital instrumentation panel with a fuel gauge and clock may seem a bit old school with so many bikes receiving color TFT displays these days, but it’s miles ahead of the old analog gauges it replaces. You can also now get the KLR with a USB power port and even heated grips as factory accessories. While the fuel tank remains gallons, a new tank design places the fuel pump at the bottom of the tank to ensure more fuel can be captured when you are running low. No more tipping the bike side-to-side when you run out of fuel to gather the last few ounces.



Numerous parts have been updated for increased long-range travel capability including a longer wheelbase and new front-end geometry that improves stability on the highway, fine-tuned ergos for increased comfort, new rubber mounted touch points for reduced vibrations, and increased generator capacity for powering various electronics and accessories.

The KLR motorcycle’s high tensile, semi-double-cradle frame receives several updates on the model. The updates now include a rear frame that is integrated with the main frame to increase torsional rigidity for a more composed ride and a 30mm longer swingarm with a 2mm larger diameter swingarm pivot shaft that also contributes to better handling.

Off-road, the new KLR has the same inches of suspension travel in front and inches in the rear but the suspension settings have been optimized. As before, it rides on a 21” front and 17” rear spoke wheels that are tube type, although the rims have been strengthened and larger-diameter axles help improve durability. 

The all-new KLR gets improved braking power from a larger front disc while a thicker rear disc aids in heat dissipation during heavy braking. And for the first time, the KLR is available with optional ABS. The ABS system is tuned for dirt with the intervention coming on later than a typical on-road ABS system, which allows the tires to slide slightly before the ABS kicks in. However, the system cannot be switched off completely. 

Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR
Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR

For , the KLR motorcycle will also be available in two new special edition versions (Adventure and Traveler) featuring a number of Kawasaki Genuine Accessories including side cases, engine guards, LED auxiliary light set, and more. 

With the addition of fuel injection and all the new equipment, the Gen-3 KLR was bound to gain some pounds. It now weighs in at pounds wet (non-ABS), which is 24 pounds heavier than the outgoing model. No doubt the additional heft will be noticed on the trail but hopefully the increased power from the fuel injection will help compensate on the road. 

Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR

Messing around with the KLR was always going to be controversial and it’s impossible to please everyone’s desires for a new KLR. For such an important model for the brand, one would expect Kawasaki did their due diligence before making any changes, so we’ll wait for a test ride before we make any judgments. And let’s hope these new updates are strong enough to keep the KLR in Kawasaki’s lineup for another decade. Who knows, maybe we’ll see a new Suzuki DR and Honda XRL follow suit.

Read on below for more details about the Kawasaki KLR

HIGHLIGHTS

  • NEW Fuel-Injected cc Single-Cylinder Engine
  • NEW Multi-Functional Digital Instrumentation With Fuel Gauge
  • NEW LED Headlight
  • NEW Bodywork including fuel tank
  • NEW Larger Front Disc And Optional ABS
  • NEW Greater Wind Protection and Styling
  • NEW Increased Carrying Capacity 
  • NEW Rear Frame
  • NEW Swingarm
  • NEW Larger Swingarm Pivot Shaft 

ENGINE

  • NEW Fuel Injection
  • NEW Revised Cam Profiles
  • NEW Exhaust Pipe Diameter
  • NEW Updated Clutch
  • NEW Increased Generator Output (from 17 to 26 amps)
  • NEW Low Maintenance Battery
  • NEW Lighter Starter, Ignition Coil, And Evaporator Canister
  • NEW Honeycomb Catalyzer

The exhaust pipe diameter has been reduced by mm to improve mid-range torque characteristics to better suit everyday riding. An oxygen sensor provides feedback to the fuel injection system, contributing to cleaner exhaust emissions and increased fuel efficiency.

Several updates have been made to improve shifting feel and reduce weight. In the clutch and transmission, the clutch release bearings were changed from ball to thrust-needle bearings, the gear dogs and shift fork have been revised on third gear, and a new finishing treatment is now used for fourth and fifth gears.

A new sealed battery adds to the convenience and is significantly lighter than the previous battery. The starter, ignition coil, and evaporator canister have all been revised and are now lighter than on previous models.

SUSPENSION & WHEELS

  • NEW Front and Rear Suspension Settings
  • NEW Larger Front Brake Disc
  • NEW Thicker Rear Brake Disc
  • NEW Optional ABS Models
  • NEW Stronger Rear Wheel Rim Material
  • NEW Larger-Diameter Axle Shafts 

Both front and rear suspension settings complement the new frame to help provide a more planted feel. In order to meet the demands of both on and off-road riding, 41 mm front forks with mm of suspension travel handle the suspension duties up front and add the rigidity needed for superb performance. Firm fork springs provide excellent bump compliance and bottoming resistance while also reducing front-end dive under heavy braking.

An adjustable Uni-Trak system with mm of suspension travel can be found on the rear and complements the front fork settings, offering progressive rear suspension action while contributing to a low center of gravity. Firm rear shock settings help resist bottoming in rough terrain and accommodate heavy loads. Rear spring preload and rebound damping adjustments allow riders to fine-tune suspension settings to suit the riding conditions and rider’s preference. The front fork and rear shock settings complement each other for light, sharp handling on smooth roads while providing the capability needed off-road.  

Complementing the KLR motorcycle’s more powerful engine is a larger mm front brake disc that delivers more substantial braking power. The disc shape has been changed from a petal-type disc to a round disc. On the rear brakes, the disc has been thickened to provide better heat dissipation when under heavy braking. Similar to the front, the back disc shape is now round. Models with and without ABS are now available and the ABS offers additional rider reassurance when riding on low-friction surfaces.

The KLR comes equipped with a 21” front wheel and 17” rear wheel that allows riding to be continued even when the paved road ends. A stronger material can now be found on the rear wheel rim, delivering improved torsional rigidity and increased durability. The front and rear tires are tube types. A larger-diameter front and rear wheel axle contribute to both durability and handling.

ERGONOMICS

  • NEW Fine-Tuned Handlebar And Footpeg Positions
  • NEW Rubber Mounts On Handlebars And Footpegs
  • NEW Fuel Tank Design With More Useable Volume
  • NEW Taller Windshield For Increased Wind Protection
  • NEW Seat Design And Materials For Improved Comfort 
  • NEW Pillion Grab Bars For Passenger Comfort
  • NEW 30mm Shorter Side Stand 

 One significant improvement has been the reduction of vibration from parts that come in contact with the rider, further contributing to comfort when on long rides.

Fine-tuned handlebar and footpeg positions have each been moved 10mm outwards to provide adjustability and put the rider in a slightly more relaxed position, to support longer hours in the saddle. The handlebars and footpegs are now rubber-mounted, reducing vibration for improved comfort. A new fuel tank design has been fitted to the KLR chassis, offering a natural fit with the rider’s knees for comfort and increased controllability. While the volume of the new fuel tank remains the same, the usable volume has been increased through redesign and a new fuel pump that draws from the very bottom of the tank, contributing to a longer cruising range.

Aiding the rider up front, a new stylish windshield can be found, which is now 50mm taller for better wind protection and features two-position bolt-on adjustability that allows windshield height to be conveniently increased a further 30mm (in the high position). The seat shape and cover have been revised and the optimized urethane thickness and firmness all contribute to increased ride comfort. Under the seat, rubber dampers have been added to further aid in rider comfort. Passenger grab bars have been reshaped, improving passenger comfort. The side stand has been shortened 30mm, making it easier to deploy and more stable on uneven terrain. 

BODYWORK & STYLING

  • NEW Shroud, Side Cover, And Tail Cowl
  • NEW Bright LED Headlight
  • NEW Taillight And Turn Signal
  • NEW All-Digital Instrument Panel
  • NEW Longer Mirror Arms

New colors and textured graphics were specifically chosen by Kawasaki to emphasize its ruggedness. A more-modern styling update includes a protector-equipped shroud design (removable side protection plates) while a new side cover design and tail cowl tie the styling package together. 

Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR
Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR

A new bright LED headlight illuminates the way when the ride continues past sunset. In the back, the taillight and turn signal design have been revised and the rearward field of vision has been improved thanks to longer mirror arms.

An all-digital instrument panel offers information at-a-glance through a large display and easy-to-read LCD screen with white backlighting. The instrument panel features a speedometer, odometer, dual trip meters, fuel gauge, clock, and indicator lamps. The narrowed-down display list prioritizes visibility of the speedometer and fuel gauge.

ACCESSORIES

A number of Kawasaki Genuine Accessories (KGA) will allow riders to personalize the looks of their KLR and offer added comfort and convenience. Kawasaki accessory side cases and top case were developed to provide a clean look with their well-matched design.

Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR
Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR

The side cases feature a top-opening design that makes it easy to add and remove items when they are mounted on the bike. The side cases easily clip onto their mounting brackets for a secure fit. The top case is large enough to accommodate an off-road style helmet. Improving convenience, side cases and the top case can be fitted with a one-key system. Complementing the accessory luggage, a larger aluminum rear carrier offers improved carrying capacity. In addition to its exclusive luggage, accessories include grip heater set, LED auxiliary light set, engine guards, DC power outlet, and USB socket. With its increased generator output, the KLR now has 80 watts available to power electronic accessories and charge devices.

SPECIAL EDITIONS

Also new for the KLR are two model variations that feature factory-equipped accessories and both come standard with ABS. The KLR ADVENTURE model comes equipped with factory-installed side cases, LED auxiliary light set, engine guards, tank pad, and both DC power outlet and USB socket and is available in the Cypher Camo Gray colorway. This model is designed for the rider who is looking for increased carrying capacity and convenience.  The KLR TRAVELER model features a factory-installed top case and both DC power outlet and USB socket and comes in Pearl Lava Orange colorway.

Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR
Kawasaki unveils all-new KLR

COLORS

The KLR is available in Pearl Sand Khaki and Pearl Lava Orange. The KLR ABS is available in Pearl Sand Khaki. The KLR ADVENTURE model is available in Cypher Camo Gray and the KLR TRAVELER model is available in Pearl Lava Orange.

MSRP

  • KLR &#; $6,
  • KLR ABS &#; $6,
  • KLR TRAVELER &#; $7,
  • KLR ADVENTURE &#; $7, 

KLR Specs

Engine Type:4-Stroke, Liquid-Cooled, DOHC, 4-Valve, Single
Displacement: cc
Bore & Stroke: x 83 mm
Compression Ratio:
Fuel System:DFI with 40mm Throttle Body
Ignition:TCBI
Transmission:5-Speed
Rake/Trail:30°/ in.
Front Wheel Travel: in.
Rear Wheel Travel: in.
Front Tire Size:90/
Rear Tire Size:/
Front Suspension:41mm Leading Axle Hydraulic Telescopic Fork
Rear Suspension:Uni-Trak® with 5-Way Adjustable Preload and Stepless Rebound Damping
Wheelbase: in.
Front Brake Type:mm Disc
Rear Brake Type:mm Disc
Fuel Tank Capacity: gal.
Ground Clearance: in.
Seat Height: in.
Curb Weight (lbs.): (Non-ABS), (ABS), (ADVENTURE), (TRAVELER)
Warranty:12 months
Sours: https://www.advpulse.com/adv-news/new-kawasaki-klr/

Injection klr fuel

Kawasaki KLR

"KLR" redirects here. For other uses, see KLR (disambiguation).

The Kawasaki KLR is a &#;cc (&#;cu&#;in) dual-sport motorcycle intended for both on-road and off-road riding. It was a long-standing model in Kawasaki's lineup, having been introduced in to replace the &#;cc (&#;cu&#;in) – Kawasaki KLR, and remaining almost unchanged through the model. The model was the first significant redesign of the KLR since its inception. It was built with a &#;cc four-stroke, DOHC, dual-counterbalanced, single-cylinder, water-cooled engine. The second significant redesign in added new features such as fuel injection and abs to the klr

The KLR is widely used as an inexpensive adventure/touring bike. The addition of luggage and personalized modifications (GPS, heated handgrips, larger windscreens) make it more functional on long trips. Bikes have been used for long distance and intercontinental trips, as well as full global circumnavigation rides e.g., by Dr. Gregory Frazier in and [1]

Models[edit]

US Marine Corps KLR preparing to load onto a helicopter,

Generation 1 ()

  • KLRA: The "A" model was introduced in , based on its KLR predecessor ( to ). The "A" model remained nearly unchanged until the introduction of the model in USA, Canada, Australia and South Africa. It is not sold in Europe due to emission regulations.
  • KLRB or Tengai: The Tengai got Adventure/Dakar styling, a full fairing blending into the tank, different sidepanels, and an unsprung front mudguard. It was sold in the US starting and in other countries for two years afterward - this could be classified as a separate model in its own right as the others are more trail bike orientated. Its name "Tengai" is a traditional Japanese saying which means "The End of The Sky."
  • KLRC: The "C" model gets completely new bodywork and is a more dirt-oriented motorcycle fitted with stiffer 41&#;mm (&#;in) front forks, improved brakes, tubular engine guard, smaller 14&#;l (&#;imp&#;gal; &#;US&#;gal) fuel tank, and steel wheel rims. Lacking a temperature gauge, it has an over-heat lamp.
  • The U.S. Military has KLRs modified by Hayes Diversified Technologies to burn military-spec fuels including diesel. (MM1) All-new engines were designed to replace the 4-stroke gasoline engines.[2] The new engines employ the original unit-construction main cases and transmission, but with new piston, cylinder, and other components. The balancing system that is used in the gasoline KLR engines (to reduce engine vibration) was removed from the military diesel KLR engines. Some components of the military diesel version can be applied to "civilian" KLR models, such as the nonspillable absorbed glass mat battery which offers several advantages over the conventional unsealed KLR batteries.

Generation 2 ()

  • KLRE: was the second major redesign of the KLR The changes include upgraded 41&#;mm (&#;in) forks, a new D-section swingarm, dual beam headlight, dual-piston front and rear brake calipers, upgraded cooling system, 4&#;mm spokes, cowling and fairing redesign as well as various redesigned parts.

Generation 3 (current)

  • Redesigned and unveiled on January 26th, , the third generation KLR brings EFI and ABS to the lineup. [3]

Specifications[edit]

KLR in its environment (the luggage is not standard)
Engine Type Single-cylinder, water-cooled, four-stroke, DOHC, 4 valves
CarburetionKeihin CVK constant velocity carburetor
Displacement &#;cc
Bore × Stroke&#;mm ×&#;83&#;mm (&#;in ×&#;&#;in)
Compression Ratio&#;: 1
Fuel Capacity&#;US&#;gal (23&#;l)
Oil Capacity &#;US&#;qt (&#;l)
Ground Clearance&#;in (&#;mm)
Seat Height &#;in (&#;mm)
Wheelbase&#;in (1,&#;mm)
Dry Weight &#;lb (&#;kg)
Suspension Front: 38mm Telescoping; Rear: Uni-Trak
Suspension/Wheel Travel Front: &#;in (&#;mm); Rear: &#;in (&#;mm)
Tires Front: 90/ Rear: /
Brakes Front: 1 disc &#;mm, single 30&#;mm piston caliper (piston area mm2) Brake pad area 23 cm2; Rear: 1 disc &#;mm diameter, single piston caliper. Master cylinder &#;mm piston diameter
Final drive× links O-Ring Chain
Engine Type Single-cylinder, water-cooled, four-stroke, DOHC, 4 valves
Carburetion Keihin CVK constant velocity carburetor
Displacement &#;cc
Bore × Stroke &#;mm ×&#;83&#;mm (&#;in ×&#;&#;in)
Compression Ratio &#;: 1
Fuel Capacity &#;US&#;gal (23&#;l)
Oil Capacity &#;US&#;qt (&#;l)
Ground Clearance &#;in (&#;mm)
Seat Height &#;in (&#;mm)
Wheelbase &#;in (1,&#;mm)
Curb Weight &#;lb (&#;kg)
Suspension Front: 41mm Telescoping; Rear: Uni-Trak
Suspension/Wheel Travel Front: &#;in (&#;mm); Rear: &#;in (&#;mm)
Tires Front: 90/ Rear: /
Brakes Front: 1 disc &#;mm, two piston caliper; Rear: 1 disc &#;mm diameter, two piston caliper
Final drive × links O-Ring Chain

redesign[edit]

In the KLR was redesigned with new aesthetics, and larger displacement &#;cc (&#;cu&#;in) single-cylinder engine. It had a new fairing design, new instrument panel, redesigned handlebar control switches, new bar-end weights, revised powerband, revised suspension has reduced travel but with less static sag, new rear swingarm, new turn signals, larger petal-style vented brake rotors (mm/mm), new twin-piston rear brake caliper, increased radiator capacity, fork diameter increased from 38 to 41&#;mm ( to &#;in), new headlight similar to that used on the Kawasaki Ninja R, larger luggage rack, firmer seat, larger-diameter wheel spokes, reinforced idler-shaft lever, called the doohickey by KLR riders.[8]

Changes over the years[edit]

Aside from livery/colors, the 1st Generation KLR did not change much between its introduction and the redesign. The key differences are:[9][10]

  • Crankshaft is unique to this year.
  • Beefed up the engine cases with extra bolts between the crank and countershaft; crank has a different part number, and may be lighter.
  • Countershaft improved with longer splines for increased engagement with sprocket.
  • Changes to front brake master cylinder.
  • Mid Changed valve cover, added bracket to hold cam chain bumper; changed crank to heavier unit; improved clutch basket with 1 more clutch plate; changed countershaft sprocket retainer from slotted plate to large nut; changed second and third gear ratios. Kickstarter no longer fits with new clutch basket. At least some early models had the matte black engine cases and covers rather than the later hammer-finished dark gray coloration found in the and later models.
  • Around this time final assembly moved from Japan to Thailand. All major parts still made in Japan.
  • New shift lever

The 2nd Generation KLR also did not change much between and being discontinued in [9][10]

  • New fairing design, new instrument panel, redesigned handlebar control switches, new bar-end weights, revised powerband, revised suspension has reduced travel but with less static sag, new rear swingarm, new turn signals, larger petal-style vented brake rotors (&#;mm front/ &#;mm rear), twin 27&#;mm piston front caliper (&#;mm piston area), Front brake pad area mm2, Master cylinder 12&#;mm piston diameter, new twin-piston rear brake caliper, increased radiator capacity, fork diameter increased from 38 to 41&#;mm ( to &#;in), new headlight similar to that used on the Kawasaki Ninja R, larger luggage rack, firmer seat, larger-diameter wheel spokes increased from &#;mm to 4&#;mm, reinforced idler-shaft lever, or doohickey.[8] Stator "alternator" upgraded to 17&#;A output, providing an additional 36&#;watt capacity.
  • New piston rings are thinner and have more tension, resulting in a significant reduction in oil consumption.
  • Mid New clutch basket with only 6 clutch plates (vs 7 since ). The change starts at engine number KLAEA
  • 1/2: (Mid year) The 41mm forks were upgraded to make the springs 40% firmer and to increase the firmness of the rebound damping by 27%. The Uni-Trak rear linkage suspension were upgraded to provide a 63% increase spring rate and to increase the firmness of the rebound damping by 83%. Changes to the seat were made to make it narrower with a more tapered front. The width of the rear of the seat has been increased and has become less tapered.
  • The second generation KLR was discontinued with the model being the final release.[4][5]
  • The third generation KLR ( year model) was unveiled on January 26th, with EFI and ABS as the most significant changes.

References[edit]

  1. ^August 30, USA – American Roadkill, Shipping Bikes and BIG DOGS, retrieved
  2. ^HDT KLRs
  3. ^KLR on Kawasaki.com
  4. ^ ab"A Fond Farewell to the Legendary Kawasaki KLR ". Web Bike World. Retrieved
  5. ^ ab"KAWASAKI KLRREST IN PEACE: THE WRAP". Dirt Bike Magazine. Retrieved
  6. ^"Canadian Kawasaki Motors Inc". www.kawasaki.ca. Retrieved
  7. ^"Check out the Kawasaki KLR™". www.kawasaki.com. Retrieved
  8. ^ abCatterson, Brian (April 24, ), " Kawasaki KLR New Edition, First Ride; Getting Better With Age", Motorcyclist, retrieved June 21,
  9. ^ ab"KLR Timeline – 'A' and 'E' models"(PDF). Watt-man. September 3, Retrieved May 16,
  10. ^ abBranch, Ben (). "A Brief History of the Kawasaki KLR". Silodrome. Retrieved

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_KLR
The Kawasaki KLR 650 is BACK! New Fuel Injected KLR Coming in 2022!

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