Sharepoint member permissions

Sharepoint member permissions DEFAULT

How to check permissions of SharePoint users and groups?

Applies to

Prerequisites

  • An existing SharePoint site.
  • A pre-created user and group in SharePoint

Steps

  1. 1 Open the SharePoint site.
  2. 2 Click on Site Actions (gear icon) and then select Site Settings.
  3. 3 Under the Users and Permissions category, click Site Permissions → Permissions → Click Permissions.
  4. 4 In the popup that appears, enter the name of the user or group in the given User/Group box and choose the required user or group from the list that appears. Alternatively you can also type the e-mail address of the user or group in the given User/group box.
  5. 5 Click Check Names, verify if the right user or group name appears and then click Check Now.

Pro-tip

Easily check permissions of users and groups across site collections with SharePoint Manager Plus. In addition you can grant or revoke permissions and copy or move permissions all from one console.

Sours: https://www.manageengine.com/sharepoint-management-reporting/kb/how-to-check-sharepoint-permissions.html

Understanding SharePoint Permissions

The Purpose of SharePoint Permissions

SharePoint permissions control the access that employees, partners, third-party suppliers and others have to your SharePoint content. You can choose who can read specific information and who cannot. SharePoint permissions extend not only to display data in lists and document libraries, but also to search results and even the user interface. For instance, if you do not have permissions to a specific document list, then in the results of a search, you will not see any documents from that list. This permissions model helps protect sensitive data from people who should not see or distribute it.

SharePoint Administration Roles

The following figure shows which system components each of the main SharePoint admin roles can manage:

Here are the SharePoint server components and the corresponding administration roles:

Server and farm roles

  • Windows Administrators — When SharePoint is installed on a Window Server, the local Administrators group on that server is automatically added to the SharePoint Farm Administrators group. As a result, these local administrators (Windows Administrators) have full control permissions on the SharePoint farm — they can install applications and software and manage Internet Information Services (IIS) web sites and Windows services. But, by default, they have no access to site content.
  • Farm Administrators — Members of the Farm Administrators group have full control permissions to all SharePoint farms; that is, they can perform all administrative tasks in SharePoint Central Administration for the server farm. For example, they can assign administrators to manage service applications, features and site collections. This group does not have access to individual sites, site collections and their content, but a Farm Administrator can easily take ownership of any site collection and get full access to its content simply by adding himself or herself to the site collection’s Administrators group on the Application Management page.

Shared services roles

  • Service application administrators — These administrators are selected by the farm administrator. They can configure settings for a specific service application in a farm. However, they cannot create service applications, access any other service applications in the farm, or perform any farm-level operations, such as topology changes. For example, the service application administrator for a search application in a farm can configure settings for that application only.
  • Feature administrators — A feature administrator is associated with one or more specific features of a service application. These administrators can manage a subset of service application settings, but not the entire service application. For example, a feature administrator might manage the Audiences feature of the User Profile service application.

Web application roles

The web application level does not have a unique administrator group, but farm administrators have control over the web applications within their scope. Members of the Farm Administrators group and members of the Administrators group on the local server can define a policy to grant individual users permissions at the web application level. The following polices are available:

  • Anonymous policies — Defines the access restriction to be applied to users that are not authorized in the domain: no policy, deny write access or deny all access.
  • Permission policies — Defines a set of permissions that can be granted to users or SharePoint groups for a site, library, list, folder, item, document or other entity. You can use the default permissions policies or create custom ones.
  • User policies — A high-level set of permissions that is applied to a web application and inherited by all site collections. Using user policy, you can grant any user or AD group unique permissions to a particular web application and all site collections within it.
  • User permissions — Defines which advanced permissions site collection administrators can use to create unique permissions for a certain web application. (I don’t know why Microsoft didn’t call this a “policy,” too, since it works like a policy.)

I’ll talk more about these policies later, in the discussion of inheritance.

Site collection roles

  • Site collection administrators — These administrators have the Full Control permission level on all sites in a site collection. They have Full Control access to all site content in that site collection, even if they do not have explicit permissions on that site. They can audit all site content and receive any administrative message. A primary and a secondary site collection administrator can be specified during the creation of a site collection.
  • Site owners — By default, members of the Owners group for a site have the Full Control permission level on that site. They can perform administrative tasks on the site, and on any list or library within the site. They receive e-mail notifications for events, such as the pending automatic deletion of inactive sites and requests for site access.

Default SharePoint Permissions Types

By default, SharePoint defines the following types of user permissions:

  • Full access — The user can manage site settings, create sub sites, and add users to groups.
  • Design — The user can view, add, update and delete approvals and customizations, as well as create and edit new document libraries and lists on the site, but cannot manage settings for the whole site.
  • Contribute — The user can view, add, update and remove list items and documents. These rights are the most common rights for regular SharePoint users, enabling them to manage documents and information on a site.
  • Read — The user can view list items, pages and download documents.
  • Edit — The user can manage lists and list items and contribute permissions.
  • View only — The user can view pages, list items and documents. Documents can be viewed only in the browser; they cannot be downloaded from a SharePoint server to a local computer.
  • Limited Access — The user can access shared resources and specific assets. Limited Access is designed to be combined with fine-grained permissions (not inherited, unique permissions) to enable users to access a specific list, document library, folder, list item or document without giving them access to the whole site. The Limited Access permission cannot be edited or deleted.

SharePoint Groups

There are two ways of assigning permissions to a SharePoint site via groups: The first one is by adding
a user to a SharePoint group, and the second one is giving an AD security group access directly to the site or putting it in a SharePoint group that has permissions on the site.

SharePoint groups enable you manage sets of users instead of individual users. A group can include individual users created in SharePoint, as well as users or groups from any identity management or domain services system, such as Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), LDAPv3-based directories, application-specific databases and identity models such as Windows Live ID.

User-defined SharePoint groups do not have specific access rights to the site. You can organize yours users into any number of groups, depending on the size and complexity of your organization or site. One important thing to mention is that SharePoint groups cannot be nested.

However, there are also predefined SharePoint groups that do grant members specific access permissions. A set of predefined groups depend on the site template you are using. Here are the predefined groups for a team site and its default permissions to the SharePoint site:

  • VisitorsRead permissions
  • MembersEdit permissions
  • OwnersFull Control permissions
  • ViewersView Only permissions

And here are the predefined groups for the publishing site template and their default permissions:

  • Restricted Readers — Can view pages and documents, but cannot view historical versions or information about permissions.
  • Style Resource Readers — Have Read permission to the Master Page Gallery and Restricted Read permission to the Style Library. By default, all authenticated users are members of this group.
  • Designers — Can view, add, update, delete, approve and customize the layout of site pages using a browser or SharePoint Designer.
  • Approvers — Can edit and approve pages, list items, and documents.
  • Hierarchy Managers — Can create sites, lists, list items, and documents.

Note that all these groups and their permissions can be changed.

The best practice is to add regular users who only need to read information to the Visitors group and add users who need to create or edit documents to the Members group. This is because users in the Members group can add, change or remove items or documents, but they cannot change the site structure, settings or appearance. Similarly, users in the Visitors group can see pages, documents and items but cannot perform add or remove operations.

Assigning Permissions on Objects

Permissions can be set on a variety of SharePoint items:

  • SharePoint farm — Administrative permissions
  • Web application — Anonymous policy, user policy, user permissions
  • Shared Services — Service app and feature administrative permissions
  • Site collection — Site collection administrative permissions, permissions
  • Subsite — Permissions
  • Document library or list — Sharing Permissions
  • Folder in the document library or list — Sharing permissions
  • Separate file — Sharing permissions

Best practices for permissions assignment

You get the opportunity to regulate access rights at various levels. If necessary, you can create exceptions (unique permissions) in setting permissions on lower levels of the hierarchy, and you can also stop the inheritance of permissions. For example, you can create unique permissions to a particular document library and prevent it from inheriting permissions from its parent.

As a best practice, you should design the higher level permission structure in as much detail as possible and minimize the number of exceptions. The more unique permissions you create at different levels, the harder it will be to audit and control access rights. Keep in mind that there are third-party tools that simplify permissions auditing and monitoring. For example, Netwrix Auditor for SharePoint can report on the current state of your SharePoint permissions, as well as the state at an earlier point in time, and alert you when anyone changes permissions.

Permissions Inheritance

By default, subsites, libraries and lists inherit permissions from the site in which they were created (the parent site). In addition, there are the policies defined at the web application level that I described earlier. All site collections inherit permissions from the web application’s user policy and anonymous policy, which grants or denies access to user accounts. Web applications also inherit user permissions, which define which permission levels can be used for creating unique permissions for site collections. The web application level also has a permission policy, which defines the high-level permission types for user policy.

If you break permissions inheritance, the subsite, document library, website or file will be able to form its own unique permissions, but, as stated earlier, only the permissions levels regulated by the web application’s user permissions will be available.

Therefore, we have two types of inheritance, which are tied to policies configured on the web application level:

  1. User policy, which is inherited by all lower level site collections.
  2. User permissions, which are inherited by all site collections advanced permissions; this inheritance cannot be broken at lower levels.

Any permission changes at the parent level site (list of items, document library) will not affect the child elements with unique permissions, and unique permissions will always win when they conflict with parent ones.

Best practices for permissions inheritance

It is much easier to manage permissions when there is a clear hierarchy of permissions that are inherited from the parent. It becomes more difficult when some lists in a site have fine-grained (unique) permissions applied, and when some sites have subsites with unique permissions and others with inherited permissions. So, it is a best practice to, as much as possible, arrange sites and subsites, lists and libraries so they can inherit most permissions from parent.

Here is a tangled SharePoint permission structure made simple for you:

Advanced Permissions

The default groups and permission levels in SharePoint provide a general framework for permissions that is useful for many types of organization. However, they might not map exactly to how users are organized or the many different tasks they perform on your sites. If the default permission levels do not suit your organization, you can create custom groups, change the permissions included in specific permission levels or create custom permission levels.

SharePoint Site Permissions

These permissions affect site and personal settings, the web interface, access and site configuration:

  • Manage Permissions — Create and change permission levels on a subsite and assign permissions to users and groups.
  • View Web Analytics Data — View site usage reports
  • Create Subsites — Create subsites such as team sites, publishing sites and newsfeed sites
  • Manage Web Site — Perform all administration and content management actions for the site
  • Add and Customize Pages — Add, change and delete HTML pages
  • Apply Themes and Borders — Apply a theme or borders to the site
  • Apply Style Sheets — Apply a style sheet (.CSS file) to the site
  • Create Groups — Create a group of users that can be used anywhere within the site collection
  • Browse Directories — Enumerate files and folders in a site using SharePoint
  • Use Self-Service Site Creation — Create a site using self-service site creation
  • View Pages — View pages in a site
  • Enumerate Permissions —Enumerate permissions on a site, list, folder, document or list item
  • Browse User Information — View information about site users
  • Manage Alerts — Manage alerts for all site users
  • Use Remote Interfaces — Use SOAP, Web DAV, Client Object Model or SharePoint Designer interfaces to access the site
  • Use Client Integration Features — Use features that launch client applications in the site (users without this permission have to download documents locally, work with them and then upload the revised documents)
  • Open — Open a site, list or folder and access items inside that container
  • Edit Personal User Information — Change one’s own user information, such as by updating a telephone number or title or adding a picture

SharePoint List Permissions

These permissions affect the management of lists, folders and documents and the viewing of items and application pages:

  • Manage Lists — Create and delete lists, list columns and public views of a list
  • Override List Behaviors — Discard or check in a document that is checked out by another user
  • Add Items — Add items to lists and documents to document libraries
  • Edit Items — Edit items in lists and documents in document libraries, and customize web part pages in document libraries
  • Delete Items — Delete items from lists and documents from document libraries
  • View Items — View items in lists and documents in document libraries
  • Approve Items — Approve or reject a new version of a list, item or document
  • Open Items — Open documents using server-side file handlers (the documents will not be downloaded to the local computer)
  • View Versions — View past versions of a list item or a document
  • Delete Versions — Delete past versions of a list item or a document
  • Create Alerts — Create alerts to track changes to lists, libraries, folders, files or list items
  • View Application Pages — View forms, views, and application pages

SharePoint Personal Permissions

These permissions affect the configuration and management of personal pages:

  • Manage Personal Views — Create, change and delete personal list views
  • Add/Remove Personal Web Parts — Add or remove personal web parts
  • Update Personal Web Parts — Add or edit personalized information in personal web parts

Jeff Melnick

Jeff is a former Director of Global Solutions Engineering at Netwrix. He is a long-time Netwrix blogger, speaker, and presenter. In the Netwrix blog, Jeff shares lifehacks, tips and tricks that can dramatically improve your system administration experience.

Free eBook SharePoint Permissions Best Practices
Sours: https://blog.netwrix.com/2018/12/26/understanding-sharepoint-permissions/
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User permissions and permission levels in SharePoint Server

APPLIES TO:yes2013 yes2016 yes2019 noSharePoint in Microsoft 365

Default permission levels are predefined sets of permissions that you can assign to individual users, groups of users, or security groups, based on the functional requirements of the users and on security considerations. SharePoint Server permission levels are defined at the site collection level and are inherited from the parent object by default.

Learn about Sharing and permissions in the SharePoint modern experience in Microsoft 365.

Default permission levels

Default permission levels are made up of a set of permissions that enable users to perform a collection of related tasks. SharePoint Server includes seven permission levels. You can customize the permissions contained within five of these permission levels. You cannot customize the permissions within the Limited Access and Full Control permission levels.

Note

Although you cannot directly edit the Limited Access and Full Control permission levels, you can make individual permissions unavailable for the entire web application, which removes those permissions from the Limited Access and Full Control permission levels. For more information, see Manage permissions for a web application in SharePoint Server.

The following table lists the default permission levels for team sites in SharePoint Server.

Permission levelDescriptionPermissions included by default
View OnlyEnables users to view application pages. The View Only permission level is used for the Excel Services Viewers group.View Application Pages
View Items
View Versions
Create Alerts
Use Self Service Site Creation
View Pages
Browse User Information
Use Remote Interfaces
Use Client Integration Features
Open
Limited AccessEnables users to access shared resources and a specific asset. Limited Access is designed to be combined with fine-grained permissions to enable users to access a specific list, document library, folder, list item, or document, without enabling them to access the whole site. Limited Access cannot be edited or deleted.View Application Pages
Browse User Information
Use Remote Interfaces
Use Client Integration Features
Open
ReadEnables users to view pages and list items, and to download documents.Limited Access permissions, plus:
View Items
Open Items
View Versions
Create Alerts
Use Self-Service Site Creation
View Pages
ContributeEnables users to manage personal views, edit items and user information, delete versions in existing lists and document libraries, and add, remove, and update personal Web Parts.Read permissions, plus:
Add Items
Edit Items
Delete Items
Delete Versions
Browse Directories
Edit Personal User Information
Manage Personal Views
Add/Remove Personal Web Parts
Update Personal Web Parts
EditEnables users to manage lists.Contribute permissions, plus:
Manage Lists
DesignEnables users to view, add, update, delete, approve, and customize items or pages in the website.Edit permissions, plus:
Add and Customize Pages
Apply Themes and Borders
Apply Style Sheets
Override List Behaviors
Approve Items
Full ControlEnables users to have full control of the website.All permissions

If you use a site template other than the team site template, you will see a different list of default SharePoint permission levels. For example, the following table shows additional permission levels provided with the publishing template.

Permission levelDescriptionPermissions included by default
Restricted ReadView pages and documents. For publishing sites only.View Items
Open Items
View Pages
Open
ApproveEdit and approve pages, list items, and documents. For publishing sites only.Contribute permissions, plus:
Override List Behaviors
Approve Items
Manage HierarchyCreate sites; edit pages, list items, and documents, and change site permissions. For Publishing sites only.Design permissions minus the Approve Items, Apply Themes and Borders, and Apply Style Sheets permissions, plus:
Manage permissions
View Web Analytics Data
Create Subsites
Manage Alerts
Enumerate Permissions
Manage Web Site

User permissions

SharePoint Server includes 33 permissions, which are used in the default permission levels. You can configure which permissions are included in a particular permission level (except for the Limited Access and Full Control permission levels), or you can create a new permission level to contain specific permissions.

Permissions are categorized as list permissions, site permissions, and personal permissions, depending on the objects to which they can be applied. For example, site permissions apply to a particular site, list permissions apply only to lists and libraries, and personal permissions apply only to certain objects, such as personal views and private Web Parts. The following tables describe what each permission is used for, the dependent permissions, and the permission levels in which it is included.

List permissions

PermissionDescriptionDependent permissionsIncluded in these permission levels by default
Manage ListsCreate and delete lists, add or remove columns in a list, and add or remove public views of a list.View Items, View Pages, OpenEdit, Design, Full Control, Manage Hierarchy
Override List BehaviorsDiscard or check in a document that is checked out to another user, and change or override settings that allow users to read/edit only their own items.View Items, View Pages, OpenDesign, Full Control
Add ItemsAdd items to lists, and add documents to document libraries.View Items, View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Edit ItemsEdit items in lists, edit documents in document libraries, and customize Web Part pages in document libraries.View Items, View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Delete ItemsDelete items from a list, and documents from a document library.View Items, View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
View ItemsView items in lists, and documents in document libraries.View Pages, OpenRead, Contribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Approve ItemsApprove a minor version of list items or document.Edit Items, View Items, View Pages, OpenDesign, Full Control
Open ItemsView the source of documents with server-side file handlers.View Items, View Pages, OpenRead, Contribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
View VersionsView past versions of a list item or document.View Items, Open Items, View Pages, OpenRead, Contribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Delete VersionsDelete past versions of list items or documents.View Items, View Versions, View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Create AlertsCreate alerts.View Items, View Pages, OpenRead, Contribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
View Application PagesView forms, views, and application pages. Enumerate lists.OpenAll

Site permissions

PermissionDescriptionDependent permissionsIncluded in these permission levels by default
Manage PermissionsCreate and change permission levels on the web site and assign permissions to users and groups.View Items, Open Items, View Versions, Browse Directories, View Pages, Enumerate Permissions, Browse User Information, OpenFull Control
View Web Analytics DataView reports on Web site usage.View Pages, OpenFull Control
Create SubsitesCreate subsites such as team sites, Meeting Workspace sites, and Document Workspace sites.View Pages, Browse User Information, OpenFull Control
Manage Web SiteGrants the ability to perform all administration tasks for the web site, as well as manage content.View Items, Add and Customize Pages, Browse Directories, View Pages, Enumerate Permissions, Browse User Information, OpenFull Control
Add and Customize PagesAdd, change, or delete HTML pages or Web Part pages, and edit the website.View Items, Browse Directories, View Pages, OpenDesign, Full Control
Apply Themes and BordersApply a theme or borders to the whole website.View Pages, OpenDesign, Full Control
Apply Style SheetsApply a style sheet (.css file) to the website.View Pages, OpenDesign, Full Control
Create GroupsCreate a group of users that can be used anywhere within the site collection.View Pages, Browse User Information, OpenFull Control
Browse DirectoriesEnumerate files and folders in a website by using SharePoint Designer 2013 and Web DAV interfaces.View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Use Self-Service Site CreationCreate a website using Self-Service Site Creation.View Pages, Browse User Information, OpenRead, Contribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
View PagesView pages in a website.OpenRead, Contribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Enumerate PermissionsEnumerate permissions on the website, list, folder, document, or list item.Browse Directories, View Pages, Browse User Information, OpenFull Control
Browse User InformationView information about users of the website.OpenAll
Manage AlertsManage alerts for all users of the website.View Items, View Pages, Open, Create AlertsFull Control
Use Remote InterfacesUse SOAP, Web DAV, the Client Object Model, or SharePoint Designer 2013 interfaces to access the website.OpenAll
Use Client Integration FeaturesUse features that launch client applications. Without this permission, users must work on documents locally and then upload their changes.Use Remote Interfaces, Open, View ItemsAll
OpenEnables users to open a website, list, or folder to access items inside that container.NoneAll
Edit Personal User InformationEnables users to change their own user information, such as adding a picture.Browse User Information, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control

Personal permissions

PermissionDescriptionDependent permissionsIncluded in these permission levels by default
Manage Personal ViewsCreate, change, and delete personal views of lists.View Items, View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Add/Remove Personal Web PartsAdd or remove personal Web Parts on a Web Part page.View Items, View Pages, Open, Update Personal Web PartsContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control
Update Personal Web PartsUpdate Web Parts to display personalized information.View Items, View Pages, OpenContribute, Edit, Design, Full Control

See also

Other Resources

Manage permissions for a web application in SharePoint Server

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/sites/user-permissions-and-permission-levels
How to Manage User Permissions in Microsoft SharePoint Online - Office 365

Since Microsoft 365 Groups are introduced as a cross-platform membership service, users have been wondering how does that connect to existing permissions in SharePoint? Since groups have their own permissions model, do they still need to use good old SharePoint permissions? We will try to explain this connection so you can better understand how to keep your documents secure.

 

The History of Microsoft 365 Groups

We have been using SharePoint Online and are familiar with SharePoint permissions for a very long time now. We are used to sharing sites, libraries, and documents either directly or by using SharePoint or Security groups, as we covered in our previous blog, Managing Permissions in SharePoint and Office 365 – Best Practices.

SharePoint Online has been doing a good job keeping your documents secure but was very disconnected from other Microsoft 365 services you probably use, like Exchange Online and Planner. To overcome this gap, Microsoft introduced Microsoft 365 Groups (formerly Office 365 Groups) as a cross-platform membership service. Microsoft 365 Groups create a more unified modern workspace and provide a group of people easy access to shared documents, email, calendar, etc.

Microsoft is moving towards connecting all their Microsoft 365 services with Microsoft 365 Groups as the future direction. Each group is associated with a collection of shared resources such as a SharePoint site, Exchange shared mailbox, shared calendar, and even chat through Microsoft Teams is an option.

 

Microsoft 365 Groups Permissions Model

Microsoft 365 Groups have their own permissions model. Group members can have two different roles:

  • Owners – can manage group members, settings, privacy, etc.
  • Members – collaborate using shared resources (SharePoint, Outlook, Teams)

These two roles directly translate to all the connected services for the group and ensure the right level of access for each one. You don’t have to worry about manually assigning permissions to all those resources. Adding members to the group automatically gives them the permissions to the tools your group provides.

Group owners can easily manage group members through almost any Microsoft app like Outlook, SharePoint Online, or Teams making their management more decentralized than traditional security groups.

Microsoft 365 Groups roles

How do Microsoft 365 Groups permissions translate to a SharePoint site?

Group owners have complete control over the SharePoint site. They are granted permissions in two ways:

  • They are automatically set as the Primary owner of the site.
  • Each site will have a Site owner’s SharePoint Group, which has Full Control on the site.

Microsoft 365 Groups’ members are placed inside the Site members’ SharePoint group, which has edit permissions on the site. Each new group related site will follow the same permissions template, as shown in the table below.

On the SharePoint site, the UI hides this complexity and only shows you the number of members inside the group in the top right corner:

microsoft 365 Group members count

 

When you click on the number of group members, you are presented with a simple view of the Microsoft 365 Groups members and their role:

Group member role

Adding New Members to Microsoft 365 Groups

You can easily add new members to the connected Microsoft 365 Groups, and your only choice is should the new member be an Owner or Member. Adding new members is pretty straightforward, but it’s essential to understand that this action grants access to all the group’s resources like Exchange, Planner, and the SharePoint site. This option is also available at the document library screen, so users must be careful not to accidentally overshare the entire site.

There are situations where you want to share either the entire SharePoint site or just a part of it and not grant access to other connected resources. If you wish to share a single document, folder, or library, all you have to do is click the Share button to get the standard experience:

sharing link settings in Microsoft 365 Groups

Things are more complicated when you want to share the entire site, you can do that, but the option is buried inside the menu Settings > Site permissions. Here you see a more advanced view of site permissions where you can use the Invite button, which offers the Share site only option. After that, you can pick between permission levels Full control, Edit and Read, which will put the users inside the corresponding SharePoint groups as we explained before:

share site only option

What about Microsoft 365 Group’s privacy settings?

Each group has two privacy settings you can choose from:

  • Public – anyone in the organization can join the group and access the site.
  • Private – only members can access the site.

This choice will affect the permissions on your SharePoint site. What we have shown so far was the site permissions setup for a Private group. The only significant difference for a Public group-related SharePoint site is that the particular member group “Everyone except external users” is part of the default Site members. You can see this on the advanced site permissions view:

invite memebers to public Microsoft 365 Groups

You can notice that this means anyone could have the Edit permission, which can significantly impact the site. It allows users to addedit, and deletelists, so you need to consider this when using Public groups.

 

What potential problems should I be aware of?

As we explained so far, Microsoft 365 Groups permissions directly translate to SharePoint permissions. They also somewhat limit the out of the box functionality SharePoint had in exchange for making it easier and simpler for the end-users. Although this is not necessarily bad, if they are not aware of the possible issues it can confuse users.

Challenge 1: There is no way to see the group members straight from the SharePoint UI on the Site Permissions screen. If you go to the Advanced permissions settings, it can get even more confusing. You can only see the permissions for SharePoint groups rather than the connected groups’ members, which is a trait of the old SharePoint 2010 user experience. Even if you click on the SharePoint groups, there is no way to see the actual group members.

memebrs of a group in SharePoint permissions report

Challenge 2: By default, all group members will have the Edit permission. Depending on how much responsibility and trust you want to place on your users, you might need to change this to Contribute to limit the amount of harm they can do. There is no built-in solution for this. You will have to rely on custom provisioning code and/or other solutions to enforce this policy after group creation.

Challenge 3: The Public privacy setting means anyone can freely join a group without any approval from the Owners, and they will have the same Edit permission as any other member, as we explained in Challenge 2. Be aware of that and define your policies on which groups should be Public.

 

Conclusion

Modern group connected sites are the future of SharePoint Online. SharePoint is no longer a loner standing in the corner but a fully integrated Microsoft 365 suite member. This comes with the obvious benefits of providing a unified modern workspace to your users, but something had to be sacrificed along the way.

Be aware of the benefits and potential drawbacks of going modern that we mentioned in this and our previous post. And remember, when you need help sorting out all this permissions complexity, SysKit Point comes to the rescue.

Regardless of how you share your content, by adding Microsoft 365 Groups members or directly sharing files, SysKit Point will see it all. You can generate reports to find answers to questions like “Who has access to what?” or “What is shared with external users?”.

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Sours: https://www.syskit.com/blog/microsoft-365-groups-vs-sharepoint-permissions/

Member permissions sharepoint

SharePoint site permissions

This article contains advanced scenarios for customizing site permissions. Most organizations won't need these options. If you just want to share files or folders, see Share SharePoint files or folders. If you want to share a site, see Share a site.

While SharePoint allows considerable customization of site permissions, we highly recommend using the built-in SharePoint groups for communication site permissions and managing team site permissions through the associated Microsoft 365 group. For information about managing permissions in the SharePoint modern experience, see Sharing and permissions in the SharePoint modern experience.

If you do need to customize SharePoint groups, this article describes how.

Customize site permissions

A SharePoint group is a collection of users who all have the same set of permissions to sites and content. Rather than assign permissions one person at a time, you can use groups to conveniently assign the same permission level to many people at once.

Note

To do the following steps, you need a permission level that includes permissions to Create Groups and Manage Permissions. The Full Control level has both. For more information, see Understanding permission levels in SharePoint.

Create a group

  1. On your website or team site, click SettingsSettings icon., and click Site permissions.

  2. On the Permissions page, click Advanced Permissions Settings.

    The permissions page opens.

  3. On the Permissions tab, click Create Group.

  4. On the Create Group page, in the Name and About me boxes, type a name and description for this SharePoint group.

  5. In the Owner box, specify a single owner of this security group.

  6. In the Group Settings section, specify who can view and edit the membership of this group.

  7. In the Membership Requests section, select the settings that you want for requests to join or leave the group. You can specify the email address to which requests should be sent.

  8. In the Give Group Permissions to this Site section, choose a permission level for this group.

  9. Click Create.

Add users to a group

You can add users to a group at any time.

  1. On your website or team site, click Share

    Click the share button to send invites to new members

    If you see Members instead of Share, click Members, and then click Add members.

  2. By default, the Share dialog that appears displays the message Invite people to Edit or Invite people. This invites the users who you add to join the SharePoint Members group. To choose a different group and permission level, click Show options and then choose a different SharePoint group or permission level under Select a group or permission level.

    Add a member to a group dialog

  3. In the Enter names, email addresses, or Everyone box, enter the name or email address of the user or group that you want to add. When the name appears in a confirmation box below your entry, select the name to add it to the text box.

  4. If you want to add more names, repeat these steps.

  5. (Optional) Enter a personalized message to send to the new users in Include a personal message with this invitation.

  6. Click Share.

Remove users from a group

  1. On your website or team site, click SettingsSettings icon., and click Site settings. If you don't see Site settings, click Site information, and then click View all site settings. On some pages, you may need to click Site contents, then click Site settings.

  2. On the Site Settings page, under Users and Permissions, click People and Groups.

  3. On the People and Groups page, in the Quick Launch, click the name of the group that you want to remove users from.

  4. Select the check boxes next to the users who you want to remove, click Actions, and then click Remove Users from Group.

  5. In the confirmation window, click OK.

Grant site access to a group

  1. On your website or team site, click SettingsSettings icon., and click Site settings. If you don't see Site settings, click Site information, and then click View all site settings. On some pages, you may need to click Site contents, then click Site settings.

  2. On the Site Settings page, under Users and Permissions, click Site Permissions.

  3. On the Permissions tab, click Grant Permissions.

  4. In the Share dialog, type the name of the SharePoint group that you want to give access to.

  5. By default, the Share dialog displays the message Invite people to Edit or Invite people with Can edit permissions. This grants permissions in the SharePoint Members group. To choose a different permission level, click Show options and then choose a different SharePoint group or permission level under Select a permission level or Select a group or permission level. The drop-down box shows both groups and individual permission levels, like Edit or View Only.

  6. Click Share.

Delete a group

Caution

We recommend that you don't delete any of the default SharePoint groups, because this can make the system unstable. You should only delete group(s) you have created and no longer want to use.

  1. On your website or team site, click SettingsSettings icon., and click Site settings. If you don't see Site settings, click Site information, and then click View all site settings. On some pages, you may need to click Site contents, then click Site settings.

  2. On the Site Settings page, under Users and Permissions, click People and Groups.

  3. On the People and Groups page, click the name of the SharePoint group that you want to delete.

  4. Click Settings, and then click Group Settings.

  5. At the bottom of the Change Group Settings page, click Delete.

  6. In the confirmation window, click OK.

Assign a new permission level to a group

If you have customized a permission level or created a new permission level, you can assign it to groups or users.

  1. On your website or team site, click SettingsSettings icon., and click Site settings. If you don't see Site settings, click Site information, and then click View all site settings. On some pages, you may need to click Site contents, then click Site settings.

  2. On the Site Settings page, under Users and Permissions, click Site Permissions.

  3. Select the check box next to the user or group to which you want to assign the new permission level.

  4. On the Permissions tab, click Edit User Permissions.

  5. On the Edit Permissions page, select the check box next to the name of the new permission level. If you select multiple permission levels, the permission level assigned to the group is the union of the individual permissions in the different levels. That is, if one level includes permissions (A, B, C), and the other level includes permissions (C, D), the new level for the group includes permissions (A, B, C, D).

  6. Click OK.

Note

Permissions for the default SharePoint groups (Owners, Members, and Visitors) for Team sites that are connected to a Microsoft 365 group can't be modified.

Add, change, or remove a site collection administrator

  1. On the site, click SettingsSettings icon, and click Site settings. If you don't see Site settings, click Site information, and then click View all site settings. On some pages, you may need to click Site contents, then click Site settings.

  2. On the Site Settings page, under Users and Permissions, click Site Collection Administrators.

  3. In the Site Collection Administrators box, do one of the following:

    • To add a site collection administrator, enter the name or user alias of the person who you want to add.

    • To change a site collection administrator, click the X next to the name of the person, and then enter a new name.

    • To remove a site collection administrator, click the X next to the name of the person.

  4. Click OK.

    Note

    To see the Site Collection Administrators link, you must be a site collection administrator, or a global or SharePoint admin in your organization. This link is not displayed to site owners.

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Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/customize-sharepoint-site-permissions
SharePoint Online Permissions and Inheritance

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